Archive for the 'Biographical' Category

2015 Nipmuck South Trail Race

Today was the Nipmuck South Trail Race, the second of the Shenipsit Striders 2015 races, race five in this year’s Connecticut Blue-Blazed Trail Running Series, and race eight in the New England Grand Tree Trail Running Series. Thankfully, Mansfield Hollow State Park is only 25 minutes from our house.

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I really didn’t want to go far today. Debbie went early to help with the pre-race stuff and I followed with our kids. We got there just before the start, grabbed some shots, and then drove to the seven mile turnaround on Old Turnpike Road, just off Rt. 44. Nipmuck South is a generally flat course with some tricky footing (rocks and roots) in spots.

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The heavy rain that started last night and continued into this morning made for a bit of a mess. Thankfully, the Nipmuck Trail drains well and the mud was only in select spots. I happened to find one of those spots near the turnaround aid station that was manned by David Merkt and Nicole Gibeau. The total length of the course is 14.1 +/- miles.

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There were a lot of Shenipsit Striders, as you would expect, in attendance. Some volunteered, some ran, and some did both. There was a tight battle for first place, with Brett Stoeffler prevailing over Todd Bennet. Jim Harron was third. First female was a dominant Kehr Davis. She finished fifth overall. Eric Wyzga had to work very hard to keep her five seconds behind his fourth place spot. Kehr was followed by Darby Dustman, who was only 15 seconds in front of Debbie, who grabbed the third spot.

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I saw a lot of smiles on the trail today. The rain and cool temperature made for great running conditions. No one was deterred by the mud. Race Director Scott Edington organized a good event on behalf of the club. It was another fun trail running event.

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The two overall winners earned a jar of honey and a bottle of maple syrup. They also earned apple pies from NipMuck Dave for winning the “trilogy” series that included the Soapstone Mountain Trail Race, Goodwin Forest Trail Run, and Nipmuck South.

Race Results

Trail Running, Scott Jurek, the Appalachian Trail, Western States Endurance Run, and So Much More

This weekend, there is so much trail running activity, it’s almost unbelievable. Debbie and I have been around this sport since 1999 and its amazing to see the growth. Last weekend, we were at the Mt. Greylock Trail Races, which was 17 years in a row for Debbie. We met at a trail race (the 1999 Vermont 50 Mile Ride & Run), so trails, running, and the trail running community are very important to me. The sport has been a huge part of my life. Because so much of my trail running experiences involve Debbie, it is as important to me as cycling, which is another one of  my true loves. Writing is another passion, so the collision of this weekend’s events, news, and friends is a joy to share.

This morning, Debbie and our two kids drove back to the Berkshires of western Massachusetts, to intercept and cheer for Scott Jurek on his Appalachian Trail (AT) supported speed record (fastest known time). I had a crazy week at work and had to spend some time at Horst Engineering’s East Hartford plant, so I missed the trip. I was able to help them track and find Jurek from afar. Jennifer Pharr-Davis has the overall AT speed record, 46 days 11 hours and 20 minutes. She set it in June/July 2011 and went from Maine to Georgia. She broke Andrew Thompson’s 2005 record. Karl Meltzer attempted to break Thompson’s record in 2008, but fell short.

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Debbie and I took our son to see Karl in New Hampshire/Vermont and cheer him on during his record attempt. Despite his promotion of the trip, sponsorship, and the emergence of social media, there was far less fanfare than today. Thompson broke Pete Palmer’s 1999 record. Palmer broke David Horton’s 1991 record. Trail running has come a long way! The AT record is really more about speed-hiking than trail running, though Jurek, Palmer, Horton, and Meltzer are all known for their ultrarunning prowess. Jurek has his work cut out for him if he is going to beat Pharr-Davis’ time. Debbie and the kids  found him just north of Goose Pond and joined him until he crossed Interstate 90, the Massachusetts Turnpike. The AT crosses the Pike on a footbridge that we have driven under hundreds of times in our lives. I’ve never actually been on the bridge. Debbie was last on it when she was leading trips for the Springfield College Outing Club in the mid-1990’s.

Jurek’s attempt is being followed by many people all over the world. He has had crowds of runners join him on the trails and many other folks coming out to greet him. When my family first saw him today, he was in a group of eight, including Meltzer, who is crewing and pacing. Social media, GPS technology, and real-time tracking have made this attempt an inspirational spectacle to follow. The Maine based mapmaker, Delorme, is helping with the Scott Jurek AT15 tracking website. Horton had a lot less attention in 1991. Ironically, Horton is getting more attention in 2015 because he has been helping out as part of the crew. After seeing Jurek and then running/hiking along with him for 10 minutes or so, they went in search of the crew and found Horton. We packed a goodie bag full of items, including Shenipsit Striders t-shirts, vegan “cheese,” and vegan chocolate with the plan to deliver it to Jurek and crew.

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David Horton is a wonderful race director and one of the legends of our sport. We last saw him at the 2013 edition of Hellgate, one of the races he directs. Our son told me that “Mr. Horton” gave them all kinds of energy “junk food” to eat including GU Chomps and other sweets. My daughter must have been thrilled! Debbie and I have been vegetarian for nearly 20 years, and like Jurek, I observe a vegan diet. I stopped eating eggs and dairy in 2008 after failing miserably at 7 Sisters that May. In 2009, with a changed attitude and changed diet, I had my best ever time at 7 Sisters. Debbie gave up her streak of 7 Sisters finishes after 16 years in a row, when she did the Miwok 100K Trail Run last month. Scott Jurek won Miwok three times.

The race director of 7 Sisters is Fred Pilon. When Debbie and the kids were with Horton this morning, Fred showed up to run with Jurek. Fred is an Editor Emeritus of Ultrarunning magazine, and a major influence on the growth of ultrarunning and trail running. Another Editor Emeritus is Tia Bodington. She is the Race Director of Miwok. We saw her last month in Stinson Beach at the finish. When I got home from work today, I fetched the mail and the latest issue of Ultrarunning was in the pile. Amazing. They timed the publication and shipment perfectly! Are you starting to understand more about the trail running community?

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We have been following Jurek’s progress since he started on the AT in Georgia, three weeks ago. We were hoping to catch him in Connecticut, but he came through yesterday and the timing didn’t work out. The “cheese” and chocolate that Debbie brought to him and the crew came from Divine Treasures, one of our favorite local businesses, in Manchester. We were inspired to contribute some vegan “treats” when we saw that someone picked up Vegan Treats for the Jurek team when they were in Pennsylvania last week. We have been to Vegan Treats several times over the years including a couple of times on our way home from the Laurel Highlands Ultra.

Jurek is well-known for his ultrarunning exploits. Debbie and I first met him in the early 2000’s when she went west to race in California and Washington, where he used to live. Notably, we saw him in 2007 when he attempted Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc for the first time. Debbie also attempted it, as did Karl Meltzer, and Hal Koerner. Our friend, Nikki Kimball, who traveled with Debbie and also ran her first ultra at the 1999 Vermont 50, won UTMB in 2007, but the others mentioned didn’t finish. It was a tough weekend for all, but we did have a nice meal together in Chamonix. Jurek has amazing palmares, and his race resume is punctuated by his seven consecutive Western States Endurance Run victories.

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Western States is happening right now, as I type. So, Jurek, one of the all time WS100 champs is in Massachusetts while Kimball, and several other friends, are at the race in California. Tia Bodington is a member of the Western States Endurance Run board of directors, and she is running today too, as is one of our fellow Shenipsit Striders, Sean Greaney. His crew, Jordan Leigh and Steve LaBranche, are also Shenipsit Striders. A year ago, Debbie was at WS100, pacing and crewing Larisa Dannis to her second place finish.

There was a big trail running relay in Massachusetts yesterday and today. The Ragnar Trail Relay was at Northfield Mountain, just east of the Berkshires and not far from the Appalachian Trail. We had many friends at that event. Has this sport grown or what?

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Tomorrow, the Shenipsit Striders are hosting our second major trail race of 2015, the Nipmuck South Trail Race in Mansfield. Last month, Debbie race directed the Soapstone Mountain Trail Race. It is part of the Connecticut Blue-Blazed Trail Running Series that Debbie and I founded, and also part of the New England Grand Tree Trail Running Series. I’m on the Board of Directors of the Connecticut Forest and Park Association the non-profit organization responsible for the Blue-Blazed Hiking Trails. Next month, Debbie and I are headed to Utah so that she can run the Speedgoat 50K. The Race Director is the “Speedgoat,” Karl Meltzer. Another important record on Scott Jurek’s resume is his 2010 24 Hour USA Record. He held that until it was broken.

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The week that Jurek was in France for his record attempt, I moderated a YPO-WPO Tri Sports Network Global Conference Call that featured him as a resource along with Debbie and fellow ultrarunning champion, Krissy Moehl. We spoke about the impact of the book, Born to Run, on the sport of trail running. Jurek featured prominently in the story. A movie version of the book is in production and due to come out soon, just like the movie version of Bill Bryson’s book, A Walk in the WoodsWhen that film comes out, we are bound to see a boom in the number of people interested in AT thru-hiking.

So, if Jurek is going to break the AT record, he has more hiking/running to do over the next couple of weeks. The toughest part of the trail is ahead of him. Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine await. Those states are home to some of our favorite trails. Debbie and I spend a lot of time in those mountains and we know how hard it will be for him. Pharr-Davis, like Meltzer, when north to south. They tackled the toughest trails first. Jurek is doing it the other way around and I like his style. I would want to finish on Katahdin too. That mountain is one of the most special places in the world for me. I was last there in 2012.

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Once Jurek gets to the White Mountains he will get to see the Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) Huts. We have spent many nights in the huts and have done some tough runs in the White’s. Debbie and I are both members of the AMC Board of Advisors. AMC volunteers maintain many miles of the Appalachian Trail in New England, including the stretch through our home state of Connecticut. Before he hits New Hampshire, he has to go through Vermont and the southern Green Mountains. That is where the Appalachian Trail overlaps with the Long Trail (LT). This weekend is also the 10th anniversary of the start of our Long Trail End-to-End Hike. Volunteers from the Green Mountain Club maintain the section of the AT that overlaps with the LT. When Jurek does get to the White’s, he will climb many 4,000 footers, the same hills that Debbie and I have climbed many times before.

For Scott Jurek, there is no question that the trail ahead is tougher than the trail behind. When Debbie was with David Horton earlier today, she sent a text to our longtime trail running friend, Stanley Tiska. His backyard in Hinsdale, is practically on the Appalachian Trail. She told him about Jurek and he ended up running backwards on the trail to intercept him. He got to run four fun miles with him. Tiska was an early mentor for Debbie when she was a 24-year-old rookie trail runner. In those days, all of the “men” on the trail running circuit, referred to her as Pony Tail.

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Debbie and I are fortunate to have been part of the trail running community the past 17 years. We have met some awesome friends. We have developed an even deeper appreciation for conservation, education, and outdoor recreation. Our support for many of the organizations I’ve mentioned includes our volunteerism and our philanthropy. Through Horst Engineering, we are members of 1% For The Planet and support many environmental organizations. We love the trails. When Debbie and the kids headed out this morning, I knew I was missing out, but truth be told, I didn’t miss anything at all. Their adventure got me excited and all of these great memories came flooding back. My blog has chronicled this journey, at least over the past eight years since I’ve been publishing it. In this post, I’ve missed as many connections as I’ve remembered, but that is how it goes. I’m sure I’ll remember more later.

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Thank you Scott Jurek for continuing to inspire and for unleashing all of these great thoughts for me; your running has brightened my day.

2015 Mt. Greylock Trail Races

Today was  the Mt. Greylock Trail Races, a Father’s Day tradition. Greylock is one of the WMAC Trilogy races and also one of the original New England Grand Tree Trail Running Series races. It was even featured in today’s Hartford Courantas one of the top ten toughest trail running races in New England. Courant reporter, Lori Riley, gave Debbie and me a call earlier this week to get our thoughts on this list. With the big initial climb straight to the summit of Massachusetts highest peak, and the rugged descending, Greylock is worthy of being on the list. 2015_Greylock Trail Races 64 2015_Greylock Trail Races 196

Debbie ran it for the 17th year in a row. She has run it single, run it married without kids, run it pregnant, run it after having kids, and now run it as a 40 year-old. When you have a streak like this, you use it as a measuring stick. She had another streak broken earlier this year when she skipped 7 Sisters, after 16 in a row, in favor of running the Miwok 100K.

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I’m sure she will return to Sisters, but this year, the change was good. Debbie started running the Grand Tree circuit as a 24 year-old and now is one of the veterans of the series. It’s kind of cool to think about the number of friends that we have made in the trail running community. It’s always great to return to Greylock Glen and exchange war stories.

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I opted to hang out in the Glen with our daughter and take photos. My left foot isn’t ready for the pounding of the Grand Tree race courses. I’m nursing it through 2015 with only short races on easy terrain. Our son ran his third Greylock 5K (short course) and had a blast. I think I know where he gets his competitive desire. 2015_Greylock Trail Races 179 2015_Greylock Trail Races 100

First place in the long course went to Mark Rabasco. He was followed by Karl Young and Stanislav Trufanov. First woman was Kehr Davis. She was fourth overall. She was followed by Athena Eyster and then by Debbie. 2015_Greylock Trail Races 132

We hung out after the race and then enjoyed a meal in Northampton on the drive home. Greylock is a tradition, that for now, continues.

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Race Results

2015 Kids Who Tri Succeed Triathlon (Farmington)

Today was the Kids Who Tri Succeed Triathlon in Farmington, Connecticut. This was the first time that this race was held at Batterson Park. Our kids have done the sister race in Mansfield several times. Horst Engineering is a long time sponsor of the races. We love supporting these kids events and our kids love them too.

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Both courses are good, but I think we prefer the Farmington course. We should be back in Mansfield in August. I’m glad they added a second race closer to Hartford. The registration numbers were lower than I expected, but it was the first year and I bet it builds momentum. The weather conditions were perfect and the temperature in Batterson Lake was fine.

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We saw some of our friends from past races and there were a lot of “rookies” too. The volunteers did their best to organize what is a difficult event. With four age groups, four different courses,  and multiple waves per age group; the logistics are a real challenge. Jerry Turk, Kerry Arsenault, and their team from Rat Race Timing had the unenviable responsibility of doing the results. They timed the Soapstone Mountain Trail Race last month and it was a lot easier.

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These races are a sports photographer’s dream. There were so many great smiles and so many great moments. I love seeing the interaction between parents and children. Triathlon has brought a lot of joy to our household. The exercise is pretty good too. In addition to our family business, there were many other great sponsors.

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The post-race raffle was well attended and lots of kids/families walked away with prizes. I’ve noted in the past that the volunteers go out of their way to make the kids feel like pros for a day. Our daughter was in the 4-6 year old field. Our son is eight, but opted for the 9-11 year old field so that he could race the longer course. It took him a 22.5 minutes, which is a fantastic workout. Our daughter’s race was just over 12 minutes. On the surface, it may seem like an expensive and time-consuming proposition to race for so little time, but exposing kids to this type of activity is setting them up for a lifetime of athletic enjoyment.

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We have a lot of experience with endurance events, but we saw families with no experience and they were having a blast. Try it.

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Race Results

Hartford Business Journal Op-Ed

If you live in Connecticut, it has been hard to ignore the challenges of this year’s budget process. Many of us in the business community have been critical of the legislative process and the outcome of legislation to raise taxes and other business costs. Pressure from the CBIA and businesses, including several large ones based in Connecticut, has resulted in Governor Dannel Malloy proposing a “roll back” of the legislation and a special legislative session to review the situation.

Two weeks ago, I had an op-ed published in the Hartford Business Journal. I’ve done several other interviews related to this matter and the manufacturing economy. Click here for the HBJ story on their site, but I also pasted in the op-ed.

This is the op-ed as published on 01 June 2015:

Manufacturing matters to Connecticut’s economy. With the right legislative action, we can attract new business, help existing firms expand here, and create good jobs.  We just need to reduce risk.

Horst Engineering, the 69 year-old family business that I lead, recently closed our Mexican operations and is expanding precision machining and forming operations in Connecticut and Massachusetts. We see opportunities here but are keenly aware of the weaknesses and threats that could derail our growth.  We decided to take the risk.

Connecticut needs to do more if it is going to gain from the expansion of the high value aerospace sector. The CBIA reported in the 2014 Survey of Connecticut Manufacturing Workforce Needs that manufacturing is the “single largest contributor to Connecticut’s gross state product.” The survey highlighted that 4,500 firms directly employ more than 161,000 people, which is 10% of all nonfarm jobs. Many of those firms are small businesses that are hiring and increasing wages and benefits. In addition to these human resource investments, many are investing in advanced manufacturing technologies, equipment, and facilities.

A recent Hartford Business Journal story cited a PricewaterhouseCoopers report ranking Connecticut last in “attractiveness for aerospace manufacturing.” These sorts of proclamations grab your attention, but the story points out that the report did not necessarily identify the “best places” for aerospace manufacturing. Statistics aside, Connecticut has a deep base of talented aerospace manufacturing companies, but is saddled with the highest operating costs in the country.

Several additional jobs are needed to support each manufacturing employee, and this beneficial compound effect is stronger during an expansion. Manufacturers in high precision industries rely heavily on an ecosystem of suppliers to produce complete products.  New England is fortunate to have a large cluster of companies in this ecosystem, many along the Connecticut River Valley.

The Aerospace Components Manufacturers (ACM) and Connecticut Tooling & Industry Association (CTMA) are two industry groups that exhibit the strength of our ecosystem. These peer networks are built on collaboration, education, and networking. They should be fostered.

In Mexico, CNC machining and manufacturing engineering are sought after careers. Recently, Mexico has run into the same challenge that has dogged Connecticut for years. There aren’t enough skilled workers in the pipeline to satisfy the current needs of industry. With the right technology and lean enterprise, we can compete with places like Mexico – if we invest in education and training needed by Connecticut companies.

Connecticut’s manufacturing workforce is accustomed to a high value mix of low volume products, but the availability of those skills is tighter than ever. Connecticut faces huge challenges as a result of the high cost of doing business in our state.  Yet the headlines are disheartening. Why would a legislature risk derailing a manufacturing recovery by hiking taxes, increasing mandates, and adding to unsustainable levels of government spending?

Over the next 10 years, Connecticut’s manufacturers will battle an additional drain as another generation of skilled labor moves towards retirement. If Connecticut is to retain the workers it has and capitalize on its strengths, then, it will have to wake up to the fact that industries like aerospace are growing at a rapid rate in South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Florida, where these jobs are desired. According to the PwC survey, several of those states are in the top 10 most attractive.

Our legislators and governor should recognize how important manufacturing is to our economy. They should be friendlier to all businesses, reduce the cost of doing business, increase support for technical education, and allow entrepreneurs to innovate. Despite a harsh economic climate, Connecticut’s businesses have persevered, but that resilience is being tested again.

Highlighting the current strength of the aerospace sector, it is worth noting that Connecticut is known worldwide for its supply chain. An unprecedented wave of growth in commercial aviation is creating opportunities for the customers that many Connecticut companies depend on. If you don’t provide water and sunlight to a flower, it won’t grow. Sadly, our politicians are doing the opposite of what is needed. Their harmful bills and policies are like a man-made drought with shade, starving plants of another type, plants which should be a critical engine of our economy.

So if manufacturing is going to continue to matter to a state that has depended on it for a long time, then all stakeholders should revisit the weaknesses and threats that are a disincentive for manufacturers to reinvest in our home state.

Horst Engineering has taken a big risk by closing in Mexico to expand in New England.  Let’s hope our legislature can reduce that risk and increase Connecticut’s desirability so all types of businesses will look to our state as that right place to expand, grow and prosper.

Hans Christian Anderson Montessori School Graduation

Last Friday was our daughter’s last day at Hans Christian Anderson Montessori School (HCAMS). I wrote about the Montessori Method several years ago. I’m not an expert on education. I leave the debate about methods, testing, and other issues to others. I do know that the majority of the property taxes that we pay in East Hartford, South Windsor, and Lynn (MA) (through the business); and in Bolton (where we live) go towards education. A lot of our state income tax payments also fund education. I assume that there are inefficiencies because government and bureaucracy are part of the equation.

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We are fortunate that over the last six years, we have been able to pay tuition and send our children to private Montessori school for their pre-kindergarten and kindergarten years. From what I’ve read, and from my own experiences, I know that education in these formative years is an incredible difference maker. We are fortunate that this school is less than a mile from our house, has a strong standing in the community, and a great history. Debbie has served on the board for more than five years. She has been a dedicated member and a wonderful volunteer. She and her fellow board members have done such good work.

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At last Friday’s end of year picnic and graduation ceremony, I was feeling emotional about the years that we have been directly involved. As long as we live in Bolton, we will see the school every day, but with our daughter joining our son at Bolton Center School for their remaining elementary and middle-school years, the Montessori experience is now history. I highly recommend this method of teaching and learning. A big thanks goes out to all the teachers and administrators who have made the HCAMS experience so wonderful for our children over the last six years.

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Our last day ended with a fun show by Magician Matias, who came all the way from New York to entertain us. Debbie did the research, found him, and booked him. I laughed as much as the children. He was great. I alway thought graduation ceremonies for “little ones” were silly, but I’m a convert. If you saw the smiles on the three children that wrapped up their HCAMS years, you would smile too.

2015 Connecticut Trails Day & Bolton Land Trust Tales and Trails Hike

National Trails Day is one of our favorite “holidays” of the year. Connecticut Trails Day Weekend is our extended and local version of this holiday. Every year, we do something special. For the second year in a row, Debbie hosted one of the 200+ Connecticut Trails Day Events. She worked with her fellow board members from the Bolton Land Trust to put on the Tales and Trails Hike this afternoon.

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Tales and Trails was a family focused walk at the Lombardi Ridge Preserve in Bolton, our hometown. We walked the 1.5 mile loop and heard from four entertainers. As we made our way through the woods, there were four specified stops. At each location we stopped to listen.

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First we heard from Dorothy Hall, who told us all kinds of interesting facts about hawks and then read a story about two hawks (a romantic couple) that she saw outside her window. She quizzed us about what a group of hawks is. None of us knew that it is called a “kettle.” Dorothy is the Bolton Land Trust’s Artist in Residence. Years, ago, she drew the invitation for a talk that Debbie and I gave about our 2005 Long Trail End-to-End Hike. I’ve got to locate a copy of that sketch! Her artwork appears on every land trust event invitation that we receive in the mail.

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Second, we heard from Brian Miller, who read, The Giving Tree, by Shel Silverstein. He read the classic many times to his children and today, shared it for all the children and adults, who paused under the trees of Bolton on a beautiful afternoon.

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Third, we heard from Kris Treat, who read a Little Bear story that she often read to her boys when they were young. She joked that it was a “long yarn” and even had a ball of yarn as a prop. She did a great reading as we all sat around on the rocks.

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Lastly, we heard from Robbie Whitcomb, a fabulous local entertainer who has performed at land trust events in the past. He didn’t read a thing, but rather, rapped and recited some of his original work, including a poem called, “White Bread.” After Richard Treat, a fellow BLT board member, described Robbie’s accomplishments, he turned it over to our son, who is a fan, to introduce Mr. Robbie. Robbie stood high atop a large rock, which made the presentation more fun.

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We wrapped up the hike with a small gathering and enjoyed watermelon.

Trails Day is fantastic. The Connecticut Forest & Park Association (CFPA), of which I’m a board member, does fantastic work in getting people into nature. Horst Engineering has sponsored Trails Day for several years, and the Livingston Family is proud to help such a great effort.


Livingston Photo & Word

Horst Engineering

Thread Rolling Inc.

Sterling Machine

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Surface #grinding the face of a non-metallic insert that was brazed to a rectangular head steel #fastener for an #Aerospace application. The bolt was made on a #cnc Swiss screw machine and #threadrolling is the next operation. #instamachinist #cncmachining #machining #manufacturing @horsteng #madeintheusa #horstengineering Race 2 of the #Bolton Summer #XC Series. #shenipsitstriders #trailrunning #Trails #running #crosscountry Any guesses? #waterjet from steel, years ago by the skilled craftsman from the shop I visited today. #precisionmachining #instamachinist #manufacturing #madeintheusa Southern #Nipmuck Trail Race near the 7 mile turnaround. Only #mud puddle on the course. #trailrunning #blueblazed #shenipsitstriders @runcarlyrun Start of the Southern Nipmuck Trail Race. #ctwoodlands #blueblazed #shenipsitstriders #trailrunning @shenipsitstrdrs @trailrunningmom #nipmuck These #Aerospace rod end bodies  require some serious #threadrolling force from our 40-tom 2-die machine. 1.250-12 UNJF-3A x 4.00 inches long on 13-8 MO steel. We prepare the pitch diameter by #centerlessgrinding the blanks first. #manufacturing #cnc #cncmachining #instamachinist #horstengineering @horsteng #madeintheusa Our team roll threaded the larger 2.250-12 UNS-2A for strength per the customer's requirements. The customer made this special fitting from 303 stainless steel for an oil & gas application and we did the #threadrolling operation with the big inside diameter finished. #precisionmachining @horsteng #instamachinist #cnc #cncmachining #manufacturing #horstengineering #madeintheusa @trailrunningmom captured this image of our kids after they hunted down and intercepted @scottjurek #scottjurek and his entourage on the #appalachiantrail in the #berkshires this morning. #karlmeltzer is running shotgun in this image. Our kids kept pace for a mile or so. They were the caboose on this train! #shenipsitstriders #Trails #trailrunning #ultrarunning @appalachianmountainclub @appalachiantrail #teamlivingston Here we are #centerlessgrinding 6061 Aluminum tubing prior to the Swiss screw machine process that will convert the material into tie rods for an aircraft valve intake door. We send the full 12 foot bars through our Cincinnati #2 and remove .009 stock from the diameter in one pass. The tolerance is range is +/-.0003. #precisionmachining #instamachinist #cnc #cncmachining #Aerospace #manufacturing #horstengineering @horsteng #madeintheusa

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