Archive for the 'Business' Category

Patagonia & The Worn Wear College Tour

There are few businesses that I admire more than Patagonia. I’ve been a fan since I purchased my first Synchilla jacket at their Boston store in 1991. In the early 2000’s, Debbie was on the Montrail Patagonia Ultrarunning team, and we have maintained a 15 year affiliation with the company. We have friends who work for the company, and we have provided feedback on clothing and gear. For years (back in my days of shooting slides) I sent images of “Patagoniacs” to them with the hope that one would be published in a catalog. We consider ourselves to be customers and ambassadors for the brand.

My admiration isn’t just for the gear, but for the business. Like Horst Engineering, they are privately held, family owned, driven by their mission, and focused on their core values. Even though they are much larger (around $700 million in annual revenue), they have maintained the long view. I have heard others scoff at the cost of Patagonia’s products. There is no question that they command a premium, but when you learn more about them, you realize that there is value in that price. Like L.L. Bean, another business I admire, they guarantee their products for life, and have invested profits wisely, leading to decades of amazing growth. They focus on durabilty and their products have a long life. Last year, I brought back 15 years and 20 pounds of worn out Patagonia Capilene (much of it smelly!) under garments/base layers. They have partners who recycle the polyester, and turn it back into new fabrics.

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Yesterday afternoon, I visited Yale University in New Haven to check out Patagonia’s 2017 Worn Wear College Tour. It was part of Yale Sustainability’s full-day extravaganza focused on extending the life of products to keep items out of the waste stream. I hadn’t heard about this event until Debbie sent a link that came from our friend Richard Treat, a Bolton neighbor, and one of Debbie’s fellow Bolton Land Trust board members.

The Patagonia Worn Wear repair team brought their truck, Delia. It was reported that 1,000 people showed up and the Patagonia team helped attendees make more than 500 “do it yourself” repairs on clothing (not just Patagonia’s). Patagonia has made an effort to repurpose and resell used gear as an alternative to the cost (and impact) of buying new. eBay has a thriving Patagonia pre-owned category. The company previously made a splash when in a full-page New York Times advertisement on Black Friday, they told people to “Don’t Buy This Jacket.”

I wasn’t able to make the Repair, Reuse, Repurpose Fair, but I did make it to the Yale School of Management (Evans Hall) in time for an evening panel discussion featuring Rick Ridgeway Patagonia’s Vice President of Environmental Initiatives, Adam Werbach from Yerdle, a business that helps leading brands develop re-use programs; and Scott Briscoe from the National Outdoor Leadership School. There were about 30 attendees, so we had a nice intimate discussion.
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Ridgeway is someone I’ve read a lot about, so it was nice to see him in person. Years ago, I read his books: Seven Summits (1985), The Shadow of Kilimanjaro (1997), Below Another Sky (2002), and The Big Open (2006). He is a legendary mountaineer and a fantastic adventure writer. He is also pretty good behind a camera. In 1978, with John Roskelley, he summited K2, the world’s second highest mountain (8,611 m/28,251 ft). K2 is one of the most dangerous and most difficult mountains to climb. He did the climb without supplemental oxygen, which is an amazing accomplishment. Their teammates, Jim Wickwire and Louis Reichardt reached the summit the day before. This four-man expedition was the first conquest of K2 by an American team. He was also part of the original Seven Summits expedition with Dick Bass and Frank Wells. Both were successful businessmen, and Dick founded Snowbird.
Another great adventure that Ridgeway was part of was in 2002 when he teamed up with three other famous explorers, Conrad Anker, Jimmy Chin, and the late Galen Rowell, to cross the Chang Tang in Tibet. I read about that adventure in National Geographic Magazine and heard about it on NPR. The Connecticut Forest & Park Association hosted Chin (also at Yale), back in 2010, and I had the chance to meet him. Many of them have been featured in films that were part of past Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tours. Last month, we saw the 2017 tour in Hartford.  They have all done great work on behalf of Mother Earth. I have several of Rowell’s books. He, his wife, Barbara, and two friends perished in a small plane crash in 2002, shortly after the Chang Tang expedition. He was a great photographer. I could go on and on about these adventurers and their exploits.
When you have a love of the outdoors like I do, it’s all connected! Mountains, writing, and photography are three of my passions, but so is responsible business, which brings us back to Patagonia and their mission:
Build the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, use business to inspire and implement solutions to the environmental crisis.
Patagonia’s founder is Yvon Chouinard. I’ve read his books, Let My People Go Surfing, and The Responsible Company. The recently ordered the latter for Horst Engineering’s Green Team and it is soon to become required reading. Chouinard is also the co-founder of 1% For The Planet, of which we are also a member. Like Patagonia, our family and our businesses supports many not-for-profit environmental organizations.
Manufacturing creates waste and our goal is to minimize that waste. That is why Chouinard and Vincent Stanley, his Responsible Company co-author, suggest that no business is “sustainable,” but every business can strive to be more “responsible.” Last night, Ridgeway walked us through an overview of Patagonia’s history, highlighting many of their business practices. He explained how their mantra has shifted from:
  • Reduce
  • Repair
  • Reuse
  • Recycle

to:

  • Repair

  • Resell

  • Recycle

  • Reduce

He spoke about “downcycling,” Life Cycle Assesments (LCA), and “dematerialization.” The fashion industry generates a tremendous amount of waste. He spoke about the 2011 advertisement that caused caught the attention of many. I read a good New Yorker story  about Patagonia’s post-Great Recession approach to consumerism. Last year, I listened to the Rich Roll Podcast with Andrew Morgan on the True Cost of Fast Fashion, and it was enlightening. We all have to pay attention where our products, including clothing, comes from.

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I didn’t know much about Patagonia’s new venture, Patagonia Provisions, but Ridgeway explained that the next frontier was food. Food waste is the greatest kind of waste and much bigger than clothing, hence Patagonia’s desire to make an impact. I could relay so many of Patagonia’s accomplishments. Ridgeway covered many, including their 1% contributions, their organic cotton strategy, their work with Wal-Mart on sustainable sourcing, their climate change efforts, and their direct land conservation. The company is often viewed as radical. They make no bones about their advocacy. It is part of their mission. Much has been written about the company, so you can do your own research.

After Ridgeway spoke, we heard from Briscoe, who was part of Expedition Denali, which was organized by the National Outdoor Leadership School. Debbie is a NOLS graduate. She did an outdoor educator course in 2001, the year we were married. In the summer of 2013 brought together a group of climbers who made history as the first team of African-Americans to scale America’s highest mountain. It turns out that Briscoe and I have some connections. Back in January, one of the key organizers at NOLS, Aparna Rajagopal-Durbin (now up The Avarna Group), and her partner Ava Holliday, did Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion training for the Appalachian Mountain Club Board of Directors at our retreat. Some of the statistics that they shared about the lack of diversity in the outdoor community, were startling. Briscoe spoke of breaking down barriers and the need to get more minorities outdoors and enjoying nature. He mentioned that three out of NOLS 600 instructors are black. I found that to be telling. AMC, NOLS, and many conservation oriented .org’s have struggled to recruit a more diverse membership, but we keep trying. The movie, An American Ascent, showcases the Denali expedition, and will be screened by Yale Outdoors on Friday.

Look for the Worn Wear Tour as it continues. Later this week, they will be at UMASS in Amherst, Massachusetts, and then they are headed to MIT in Cambridge.

Patagonia is an inspiration for me ,and when I make decisions on behalf of Horst Engineering, and I think about how they would respond. Aerospace manufacturing and precision machining are different from clothing manufacturing, but as a locally owned family business, we already have a leg up on the competition. Debbie and I often speak with our young children about making good consumer choices and they are already learning how to “vote with their wallets.” Long term thinking is already part of our company culture. Our investments in energy efficiency and our ongoing success contributes to the success of many other organizations, and we strive to do our business the right way, with the least impact possible. We have much work left to do.

2017 USA Cyclo-Cross Nationals 40-49 Non-Championship

Wow. Wow. Wow. What a race. I left my iPhone back at Horst Engineering by mistake, so I don’t have any of my own photos from the race. I capture a few images of the “aftermath.”

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That’s OK, I needed both hands to hold on to the handlebars! The 2017 USA Cyclo-Cross National Championships kicked off in a big way today. I’m feeling a bit sad for the Riverside Park course. It’s already taken a beating and there are five days of racing to go.

I love cyclocross and the environment, so I’ll be there (with the crews) in the spring to fix the course up. Cross does do damage when conditions are as wet as they were today. Riverside Park isn’t pristine anyway. It is in the Connecticut River flood plain, which made the mud so, well…muddy.

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The rain came down heavily and turned the course into a quagmire. I pre-rode yesterday when it was 34 degrees Fahrenheit, firm, and a bit icy. Today, it was 40 degrees and pouring. Many of the rideable sections became unrideable as the race went on.

The downhill off the dike was treacherous. I opted for caution, which may have cost me some time, but saved me in the long run. I’ll be able to go to work tomorrow! I had a really good start, lost some ground, made up a little ground, made a few mistakes, and then pretty much survived until the finish.

I was able to get three laps done, but only cover 5.8 miles in 44:36. That was good for 19th out of about a 100 riders. I would love to break the top-15 in the 45-49 Championship Race on Friday. There will be a little more top competition, but filter out the “younger” guys, and it’s possible.

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Adam Myerson, who is one of our sponsored Horst Spikes athletes, rode marvelously for the win. I’m pretty sure he was using Ice & Snow Cross Spikes, just like me. Horst Spikes have been popular this week. We are letting athletes pick-up at our 36 Cedar St. plant, which is only five minutes from the park. Toe spikes were critical for maintaining any grip on the uphill sections.

The entire Team Horst Sports 40-49 year-old squad did well. I was followed by Wade Summers, Art Roti, Andris Skulte, and Randall Dutton. Our 50-59 riders were on the course when I packed up and headed for a warmer environment. I shouted loudly for Matt Domnarski, Tom Ricardi, and Dave Geissert. I had a lot of friends in the race too, and they weren’t all local. Aaron Ofsiany was in town from San Francisco. I’ll see him again later in the week.

I started on Row 2, along with my long time friend, Jon Gallagher. Jon and I spent the summer of 1994 together and we have had some great adventures over the years. This was another one to add to the list. I chased him for the first part of the race before he pulled away to finish 13th. His timing services business is handling all of the official results for the race this week.

Judging by some of the Facebook and Instagram footage, anyone who raced today deserves monster kudos.

Race Results

Preview: 2017 USA Cyclo-Cross Nationals

I helped with the Horst Spikes marketing related to next week’s USA Cyclo-Cross National Championships. Here is the basic info. Be sure to check out the Horst Spikes News, in case you haven’t seen it already!

Next week, Hartford, Connecticut is welcoming the 2017 USA Cyclo-Cross National Championships.

 

Today, we launched a special edition of Horst Spikes News that is chock full of resources for athletes, volunteers, and spectators. It’s a comprehensive guide to everything happening next week. Check it out.

The cyclocross season is winding down, but it will go out with a bang! The 2017 USA National Cyclocross Championships are a week away. This will be the biggest cross race that Connecticut has ever seen. The KMC Cross-Fest in October was a fantastic success and we look forward to 2017, New England has hosted the national championships on several occasions, but this is the first time the event has come to our home state.

Horst Engineering is heavily invested in the success of this event. We were founded in Hartford and our headquarters is on the Connecticut River in East Hartford, a stone’s throw from the Riverside Park venue. We are longtime supporters of hosts: The Connecticut Cycling Advancement Program (CCAP) and Riverfront Recapture.

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Team Horst Sports members will be competing in several races, including the Masters Championship and Juniors Championship events. Many team members, including those who don’t race cyclocross, will be volunteering to help.

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We organized the first ever Connecticut Riverfront Cyclocross at Riverside Park in 2003. Our lineup of Horst Spikes™ cyclocross toe spikes were tested and developed on our hometown course. Cross Spikes™ have brought us back into the bicycling industry in a big way. Our roots are in bikes and we couldn’t be more proud of Hartford to host such a cool event.

2016 March Farms CycloMadness

I’ve got soreness in muscles that I didn’t even know I had! Today’s March Farms Cyclocross was insane. We awoke to three inches of snow on the ground and by the end of my race at 11:15 A.M. there was more than six inches. It snowed steadily all morning and made for a treacherous drive to the Litchfield Hills. We took our time and got there well before the 9:30 A.M. Cub Juniors race.

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It snowed heavily during the kids race and for the first half of the Men’s Masters race, but by the end, freezing rain and rain were falling. Shepard, Sean, Cole, and the other Juniors who braved the elements deserve serious “cred” for their grit. It was cold, windy, and wet. This was the race to test Horst Spikes Ice & Snow Cross Spikes.

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The funniest moment of the day came in the Cub Juniors race when one not-so-happy cross racer promptly stopped his forward momentum and called out, “That’s it, I’m done,” and heaved his bicycle into the snow. His Mom, who was shadowing him on foot, said, “Oh no you don’t,” and prodded him to remount his steed. I couldn’t stop laughing. He finished.

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There was less riding in this “bicycle race” than any bicycle race in my career. I was forced to shoulder or push my Seven Mudhoney PRO for 90% of the 2.7 mile race. Can you believe that? In 34 minutes, I only averaged 4.8 mph “with a bicycle.” My heart rate averaged 174 and peaked at 184, so it was an all out effort.

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I was joined in the Masters race by Arthur Roti, Tom Ricardi, Paul Nyberg, and Matt Domnarski. We looked shell-shocked after the finish. Our pit bikes were covered in a layer of frozen ice. It was nearly impossible to clip into your pedals. The pedals springs were frozen shut and giant snowballs collected on the bottom of our feet. We had to repeatedly bang them against our pedals to knock off the snow and ice.

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On several of the descents, I was able to get enough connection with my pedals to ride for 20 or 30 seconds at a time before being forced to run again. March Farm is the most hilly race in the CT Series of CX, but conditions were much different compared with last year’s race. Last year, I wore shorts.

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I ended up third in the 40+ field, but it didn’t matter. Everyone who raced was a champion today. Stan Lezon got the best of me. I guess you could say that I got “dropped on the last lap.” Of course, there were only two laps. A third would have been a death march. We gained nearly 500 feet on the undulating course, and the climbing was ALL on foot. The downhills were hair-raising. A few times, I wasn’t clipped in at all and was just hanging on for dear life as I coasted to the bottom before getting off to run again.

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Today, the best strategy was to make sure you were dressed warm enough and to have a lightweight bike. The running was awkward. The footing was difficult, uneven, and slippery. Cyclocross is run in all conditions, and deep snow is no exception. I’m hoping for some wild weather at next month’s USA Cycling Cyclocross National Championship at Riverside Park in Hartford, but not this wild.

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The crew at March Farms did a great job despite the challenging conditions. The volunteers and officials also had to brave the conditions. They had a great bonfire, a warming tent, and even a mobile “pub.” Sadly, I wasn’t in the mood for a beer, but we did stop at the farm store before heading home. We showed our support by doing some Christmas shopping.

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We have to do it all over again tomorrow. The gear is drying. The bikes are still in the trailer. The temperature is supposed to rise overnight and the Elm City Cyclocross in New Haven is going to be a messy affair.

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Race Results (will be posted when online)

2016 NECX BAR Finals Cyclocross

Shepard and I closed out the long Thanksgiving Weekend with one more race, the NECX BAR Finals Cyclocross in Fitchburg, MA. This is probably my least favorite course, but I’ve now done the race three years in a row because with cross season waning, you can’t race too much!

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I’ve actually got the next few weekends off from racing, so I also wanted to race hard one more time before a period of rest. My legs were pretty hammered from Thursday’s Manchester Road Race, which went well for both Shepard and me.

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I also made a tactical error before the race even started. I missed pre-registration on Friday night by an hour and was forced to register this morning at the race. That cost me a front row start. Instead, I was in the last row behind 35 other guys. That hurt my chances. I fought way through the field on a flat and fast course that wasn’t good for passing.

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It was cold and windy, which made for group racing. You had to work together in small groups to stay out of the wind. Drafting was a huge factor. I was in a good group that included rival Keith Burgoyne, but I kept  getting gapped off the back, and ultimately, when that group blew apart on the last lap, I couldn’t hang on.

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Jeremy Brazeal worked very hard to bridge up to me, so during the last lap, we exchanged spots a few times, which made the racing fun. It was better than being hung out in the wind. I was able to make a move on him before the technical final section of the course, and hold my spot.

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I was joined in the Masters 40+ field by teammates Wade Summers and Eric Fleming. It was great to see Eric on the cross bike. He is one of my original Team Horst Sports mates from the late-1990’s. We spent a lot of time together and drove to a lot of  road races and criteriums as a duo. I was even present when first connected with Julie, his spouse.

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Randall Dutton was our lone teammate in the Masters 4/5 race. Will Kirousis, another original Horst Engineering Cycling Team mate, visiting to watch the race with his two kids. It was great to see Will. Fitchburg isn’t far from his home. Will is a successful coach and helped me with training for my first few Ironman triathlons.

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The race schedule was a bit jumbled, with the Masters 50+ and 60+ races starting earlier. We were represented in the 50+ by Matt Domanarski and Tom Ricardi. Matt rode a valiant race to stay in the front group of five, but couldn’t stick it on the last lap, and finished 4th in the sprint. He has had a fine season.

Shepard was joined in the 8:00 A.M. (first race of the day) Cub Juniors 9-14 year old field by Sean Rourke and Gabrielle Fleming. They all had fun. It’s been awesome to see the kids competing, getting better, and enjoying this cool sport.

Race Results

2016 Northampton International Cyclocross

It was a fantastic weekend at the 26th annual Verge Northampton International Cyclocross at Look Park in Massachusetts. NoHo CX is always one of my favorite events. Once again, Horst Engineering sponsored the event. We had a strong presence in the expo, selling Horst Spikes and greeting friends, old and new. Both Saturday and Sunday had racing from 8:00 A.M until 4:00 P.M., with 11 separate races each day.

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Some of the categories were combined, like the Masters 45+ and Masters 55+. Team Horst Sports had a strong presence  in both of those races. We also had a presence in the Men’s Cat 4 field, as well as the Cub Juniors 9-14 year olds. The weather was spectacular. Yesterday was dry, sunny, cool, and breezy. Today, it started cool, but by late morning, the temperature had warmed up considerably, and by afternoon, it was warm. The course was dry both days, and today, it was actually dusty. The race had a record number of registrants, with more than 700 unique riders over the course of the weekend. Many of us raced both days.

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I was in the stacked Masters 45+ field both days. Yesterday, I had the race of the year (so far), and one of my best cross races in many years. I rode stronger than anticipated, which is a great sign as we approach late season. NoHo is definitely an A race with a very strong field, so I was pleased to ride so well. I finished 18th, which is pretty good given how strong the other 70 guys were. Seconds count when you are going flat-out on such a demanding course. I was able to capitalize on my good start, hold my ground, and actually pick up several spots in the last lap. I held off a really good group of riders who were battling with me the entire race. My teammates, Matt Domnarski, Wade Summers, and Arthur Roti all rode well. The course was good for me, with long stretches of open pedaling that allowed me to use my power. There were two tough uphills that required running. Most of the corners were wide and sweeping, which played to my strengths.

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Today, I started with tired legs (as many of us did), and didn’t perform quite as well, finishing 21st in another strong field of 81 guys. I suffered quite a bit more, not able to get on top of the pedals. The course was run in reverse, there were two steep and technically demanding downhills and a steep uphill. The corners were a bit tighter and the track was a bit more technical. I kept getting gapped off of a group of five riders. Every time we hit the technical stuff, I was hesitant and lost ground. I would make it up when I had room to pedal, but eventually that sapped my strength. When the group broke apart on the last lap, I was one of the last. My teammate Matt was also in my group and I just held him off on the line. Wade and Art rode even better than yesterday.

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Debbie skipped yesterday’s race, but she and our daughter joined our son and me today. Our Cub Juniors, including our son, had two good days of racing. Watching them tackle the tough Look Park course was a joy. We saw so many friends and had a lot of fun. Many of our non-cyclocross teammates joined us in support. There were some great food trucks to choose from. We watched some amazing performances. Lizzy Gunsalus, was a standout, winning the Women’s Cat 3 race both days. At 13, she has a bright future. Emma White had a great race today, winning the Elite Women’s race after finishing second yesterday. Her brother, Curtis White, bested a strong Elite Men’s field both days. All of these riders are sponsored by Horst Spikes, which is pretty cool.

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Thank you to Adam Myerson, Alec Donahue, J.D. Bilodeau, and all of the volunteers for producing such a fine event. Once again, this race showed the joy of New England cyclocross.

Race Results, Day 1

Race Results, Day 2 

2016 Wicked Creepy Cross & Cheshire Cross

After a two weekend/three-week break from cyclocross, the Livingston Family did two great races this weekend. The first was the Cheshire Cross in Cheshire, Connecticut. This course is one of my favorites and is very near my in-law’s, the Schieffer’s, so it is super-convenient.

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The second race took longer to get to. It was the Wicked Creepy Cross in Bennington, Vermont, and it was well worth the drive through the Berkshires of Western, Massachusetts and over the Green Mountains of Vermont.

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The Cheshire course is one of the most rugged in New England with ample opportunity to crash, flat, or break your bike some other way. The rocks and roots in the woods posed a problem for me too. I had a clean race with no crashes and no bobbles, but I ran 30 psi in my Tufo tubular tires, and it wasn’t enough to keep me from bottoming out on the worst of the rocks.

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That forced me to back off and ride over the rough stuff as lightly as I could. It was a tactical error on my part, but I got through to the finish without an incident and finished somewhere inside the top ten of the Masters 40+ race. I haven’t seen the results yet, but I may have been as high as sixth place. Team Horst Sports had an awesome turnout in Cheshire with multiple riders in the 40+, 50+, 4/5, and Junior categories.

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The star of the day was teammate Matt Domnarksi, who scored the win in the 50+ race. He caught me with about a 1/2 a lap to go after starting 30 seconds behind. All of the Masters riders were on the course at the same time.  Matt and I finished together and I was very happy for him. Not far behind was Pat Cunningham, who was 2nd ahead of Jonathan Tarbox from the Expo Wheelmen. Debbie was there to support us, and our son had a good ride in the Junior 9-12 year old race. It was great to see so many kids racing. The only complaint about Cheshire Cross was that these juniors only did one lap of the course, which is lame. The winner finished in less than eight minutes. That’s not long enough. They should have done two laps, even though the slower kids at the back may have taken 30 minutes to finish.

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The entire Cheshire Cycle crew, including Race Director Hunter Pronovost and his volunteers, did a fabulous job with the race. I love Heckle Hill and the crazy people who come out to cheer.  Thom Parson’s of www.dirtwire.tv had some good coverage, including this video featuring me. The 16% grade is rideable, but it takes every ounce of energy in your legs to make it over the top. We had no time to linger after the race. We had to get to Star Hill Sports in Tolland for an afternoon of soccer matches.

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Today’s race was another great event, though we had to get up really early to make it there in time. The Junior 9-14 race was at 9:01 A.M., which meant we had to leave the house by 6:00 A.M., which we succeeded in doing. The drive was treacherous with heavy fog on Rt. 9 as we drove up and over the Green Mountains. Thankfully, it cleared a bit as we reached Bennington. The temperature was warmer and there was a lot less snow than we saw up on the ridge. We got to Willow Park in time to register and scout the course.

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Our son had a fabulous race and got to make up for the short race at Cheshire by doing three full laps of the tricky Wicked Creepy course. He was knackered at the finish, but all smiles. It didn’t rain during the races, but the ground was wet from rain and snow prior in the week. That made for some slick corners. By the time my race went off at 11:45 A.M., the ground was tacky and there was a nice groove to ride through most of the corners. The sand pit was tamped down, but still slick. The run up was a leg sapper, as usual, and my Medium Horst Spikes Cross Spikes gave me great traction. Our son used Mini Standard Horst Spikes in his size 2 shoes.

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I had a fantastic race. My fitness is coming around, as I expected it would. The three-week break from racing was just what my legs needed. I was tired after doing six races in 12 days, but those efforts are paying dividends now. I finished third in the Masters 45+ field. All of the Masters racers started together (mass start) but they scored the 35+, 45+, and 55+ riders separately. I rode another clean race and feel like I could have gone even harder, but the technical nature of the course (lots of turns) kept me from going much faster. My skills are getting better, but they still have a long way to go.

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I had fun battling with Dan Coady, who finished a few spots in front of me and got third in the 35+ field. I was in the top 10 overall for Masters, and maybe as high as seventh, but the results weren’t posted. I scored a bag of coffee from a race sponsor, which I’ll give away because I stick to tea. Even still, I was very happy to race and the Wicked Creepy and NYCROSS volunteers do a great job. After Cheshire, where there were no less than 11 Team Horst racers and at least five teammates spectating, only two of us made it to Vermont today. I was joined by Paul Nyberg, who was in the 55+ field.

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Willow Park is a great venue. There are two fabulous playgrounds. The views are wonderful. The BMX track is awesome. You can’t beat this spot for cyclocross.

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The drive home was a lot better, though the rain arrived while we were having an early supper at one of our favorite restaurants, Hearty Eats, in Shelburne Falls. When we visit Shelburne Falls, we always park next to the Bridge of Flowers. After dinner, we visited Molly Cantor Pottery, which is right next door. They have some beautiful stuff from local artisans. We got home at 6:15 P.M., after a 12+ hour day on the road. It was a great weekend.

Cheshire Cross Race Results (will be posted when available)

Wicked Creepy Cross Race Results (will be posted when available)

 

 


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@trailrunningmom at the counter @veggiegalaxy where they serve breakfast all day long! #vegetarian #vegan #cambridge Great seeing fellow ultra-runners @spencer.farrar @mikewardian and @trailrunningmom @racemaniaexpo in #boston #trailrunning #ultrarunning "Looking back, 2:04 does sound better than 2:05."-- @ryanhall3 (Being interviewed by Dave McGillivray @racemaniaexpo in #boston ) #running Even though I've heard @markallengrip tell his 1989 @ironmantri World Championship story many times, I never tire of it. He presented @racemaniaexpo @bostonu this morning. #markallen #ironman #triathlon Coach Al and @trailrunningmom demonstrate a proper front #plank and illustrate true #functionalstrength at their #trailrunning camp at @camphazenymca Campers had a day packed full of learning, exploring many other topics: descending technique, pacing, mental strength, nutrition, essential oils, and injury prevention. They even did pre-dinner #yoga and I joined them!  #fitinspiration #teamhorstsports #shenipsitstriders #ultrarunning #pursuitstrong Our version of the Poggio...after 10 years of waiting, I think we found a new training partner in the household to join @trailrunningmom and me...at least on the easy days. I'll take advantage now since in another 10 years, I'll be the one getting dropped. #horstspikes #cycling @islabikesusa #islabikes #teamhorstsports #boltonheritagefarm #bolton #Connecticut L to R: Places 2, 4, and 3 at the frigid  #BoltonRoadRace We had lots of fun. The best part is that I tower over the crew in this photo! #shenipsitstriders #silkcitystriders #teamhorstsports #railtrail #vernon #Connecticut @seven_cycles #sevencycles #teamhorstsports

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