Archive for the 'Family' Category

2016 Soapstone Mountain Trail Races

I’m going to start this blog post in reverse by writing about Kaz Rybak, the last finisher in today’s 32nd annual Soapstone Mountain Trail Race. I’ve written about Kaz before because he has been a fixture at this race over the past 26 years, half of which, Debbie has been the Race Director.

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Kaz finished the 22.5 kilometer race in 6:10:32. Over the years, he has frustrated and worried us many times, but he has also inspired us, and today, he inspired us more than ever. He violates the time cuts, he forces us to wait for hours after the second to last finisher, and he leaves us exhausted…but even still, we would never leave him in the woods alone.

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When 3:00 P.M. rolled around today, after the last of the volunteers had left, the official timers had packed up, and we were sitting in our van (it was cold!) waiting for Kaz, Debbie suggested that we go look for him. My legs were shot and I was in no condition to walk/run backwards on the course, but Debbie was willing to do it.

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We knew based on previous results that he would be coming soon, so she walked backwards on the course to the Gulf Road parking lot in Shenipsit State Forest. I drove around with the kids and waited for her. She arrived a few minutes later without having intercepted Kaz. She joined us in the van for a few more minutes, and then we saw him coming down the access road after descending the Quarry Trail. She got out and went to check on him. He didn’t stop moving. He couldn’t stop moving. If he did, he might not finish.

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This was his 26th year in a row doing the Soapstone Mountain Trail Race. We don’t think he trains much anymore. He is in his early 60’s and Soapstone is a big part of his life. He always purchases two t-shirts. We know that he looks forward to this day every year. He refuses the invitation to start earlier. He ignores our advice. He relentlessly pursues the finish line. As he came down the access road, I watched Debbie walk with him.

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Our kids were irritable, but I explained to them that their Mom serves others by directing this race and we would never go home without knowing that Kaz (and every other runner) was safe. We had put together a care package for him and left it on a picnic table at the finish line at Reddington Rock Riding Club. It consisted of two Pepsi’s, two cups of a chili, and a bowl of soup.

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Kaz never stopped moving. At this point, he was sort of shuffling down the road. Debbie walked with him, I turned around, and pulled ahead. We got him some Gatorade from the back of the van, which he drank on the fly, and then crossed Gulf Road on to the dirt road headed to the finish. Debbie stuck with him and walked the last kilometer through the woods back up to the horse riding club. He shared enough intimate thoughts with her about his life that it was clear that this race means as much to him as anything.

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The kids and I drove back around and waited for him to finish. We cheered for him and took photos. Every year, he stashes his car keys in the cook shed. His car was lonely out in the open field, where hours earlier, several hundred cars were parked. He told us that he leaves his keys behind because he doesn’t want to bring them in the woods. I was thinking, that’s smart. It would really suck to get back to your car after six hours and not have your keys. This year, he left two safety pins stashed with his keys and told Debbie that he didn’t bring them during the race because every ounce matters and they would weigh him down. From a distance, I overheard this, and chuckled loudly.

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Then, we packed all of his food and drinks in to a box and he carried it across the field to his car. He was wiped out. It took a while for him to get to the opposite side of the field. As we pulled out, we honked and yelled out to him to get some rest and take care. When you have done as much adventuring and participated in endurance sports as often as we have, you have to draw inspiration from somewhere. For Debbie and me, after 25+ years of pushing ourselves to the limit, it is people like Kaz Rybak that give us that awesome feeling that motivates.

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The entire race was a success. We hosted 257 runners (177 for the half marathon and 80 for the Sampler), and fed more than 300 including the spectators and volunteers. After 13 years of directing the race, Debbie still relies on an amazing group of Shenipsit Striders club mates and volunteers from the Northern Connecticut Land Trust and Connecticut Forest & Park Association. Once again, Jerry Turk and Kerry Arsenault, from RAT Race Timing, handled the scoring. Volunteers came from everywhere, including out of state.

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The first place man was Drew Best. He was followed by Matt Shamey and Todd Bennett. The first woman was Kehr Davis. She was followed by Emma Perron and Sarah Pandiscio. The weather was perfect for runners and not so great for spectators. It was cooler than usual, with a strong west wind and intermittent clouds. Thankfully, there was no precipitation. There were several muddy spots on the trail, but the course conditions were generally good. The footing is always tricky with lots of rocks, roots, and leaves. The usual mishaps occurred, including wrong turns, and falls, causing bumps, bruises, and cuts. No one was seriously hurt. Safety is our number one goal, but when you trail run, you take risks and the responsibility is yours to bear.

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For the second year, our 9-year-old son did the 6 kilometer Sampler and had a great time. Last year, I ran with him, but we have since learned that he does better when he is on his own. So, yesterday, I decided to run the long course. I have done one or the other 13 times.

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I had a great race. I broke two hours for the third time, finishing in 1:56:54, my third fastest on the course. I gave it my all and it showed. I fell hard three separate times, the last, only a kilometer from the finish. I had a five-mile battle with Neal Leibowitz. We were never more than 10 seconds apart and traded places half a dozen times. I was stronger on the uphills and he was stronger on the downhills.

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I led him up Soapstone Mountain for the last time, but he passed me on the road after the Quarry Trail descent. I trailed him as we crossed Gulf Road, but as we made our way down the dirt road in Shenipsit State Forest, I caught my toe on a rock and went down in a heap. It sucks to fall on the road and I’m full of rash on my left (bad) shoulder, left forearm, and left leg. I’ll pay for that fall with delayed onset muscle soreness for a week or more.

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That fall gave him a gap, but I still closed in on him on the final singletrack climb before entering the riding club property. I chased him up the hill and towards the finish, but he held me off by one second. He crossed the finish line and went down on his knees. I crossed the line and listed sideways. My legs  instantly felt like jelly; I careened into the rope barriers and bumped a chip timing sensor, knocking it down as I collapsed on to my left side.

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I’ve never had that happen before. I didn’t black out, but I was momentarily incoherent. It wasn’t a pretty moment as a large crowd, including my parents witnessed it, but it symbolized that I had given it my all in an effort to catch Neal. In a weird way, I felt satisfied, but it was frightening for a few people, including my Mom. What’s the point of racing if you aren’t going to lay it all out? I got some help over to a bench, where I sat down next to Neal. We were both knackered. The EMT patched us up as we basked in the glow of having finished a tough race with a flourish. It really was a great day. I saw many grimaces, but also many smiles. The kids race was fun to watch. Introducing young ones to the sport of trail running is pure joy. Debbie and I have more work to do, cleaning pots, putting away gear, and washing our van. That work doesn’t have the same intensity as race preparation. Next year will be the 33rd edition. For now, I’ll hold the image of Debbie walking down the road with Kaz Rybak, as he slogged his way to another Soapstone finish line.

Race Results

2016 Mother’s Day Dash

For the third time, we completed the Wapack and Back/Mother’s Day Dash “double.” There is no special a prize for this, as it is a creation of our own! Despite another cold and rainy day, we made it to Vernon to run the 43rd annual Mother’s Day Dash 5K road race. Surprisingly, everyone woke up refreshed. Yesterday was a long day, so I was a bit surprised that we were all in a chipper mood. I grew up in Vernon, so it is always fun to do this event, and it was my 11th time. I know the course well.

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Debbie jogged with our daughter, who was thrilled to win the award as the youngest female finisher. Our son earned this distinction three four years ago, so she was excited to earn a trophy. Kudos go to the other two six-year olds. They just happened to have a birth month a bit closer to the race date than she did. The award was presented by our longtime friend and fellow Shenipsit Striders club mate, Tom Curtiss. The youngest male trophy is named in Tom’s honor. He has been a tireless volunteer for the local running community. It was great to see the Debbie and our daughter running together on the course. Our son had a very good race too. He knocked 24 seconds off his best 5K time, and then he won a $20 Garden Barn gift certificate in the raffle, which he wisely gave to his mom for Mother’s Day.

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The course was slightly different than in past years and I ran my quickest time, which bodes well for the upcoming triathlon season. I faded in the third mile after trying to hold on to Brett Stoeffler for the first two, but that’s OK. For my efforts, I earned a $20 gift certificate to Rein’s Deli, one of our favorite local restaurants. So, all in all, it was a good race with good swag. The recreation department always does a good job with this event.

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The winning time was a stellar 15:33, laid down by Derek Jakoboski. That’s a whole two minutes faster than my time, and a 5:00 per mile pace, which makes me shake my head. It would be nice to run that fast for one mile, never mind 3.1 miles. Second place was Ben Joyce and third was Bryan Murray. On the women’s side, it was a tight battle. First place was Linda Begley in 19:50. Second was Ariana Pike, only five seconds back. Third was Julie Jakoboski.

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It’s also worth noting that Patrick Halgren, the son of one of my Horst Engineering colleagues, Peter Halgren, completed the race using his crutches. Several years ago, Patrick lost a leg in a motorcycle accident, but he has been more active than ever. He skis, he hikes, he plays competitive basketball, and now he runs races. I checked in with him after the race to congratulate him and he told me he much prefers the trails. I told him, “I agree.” Smart kid! I’m going to invite him to run the Sampler at the the Soapstone Mountain Trail Races next Sunday. I challenge him to take on the sand pit.

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Thankfully, Vernon added a pavilion to Henry Park. It was cold (only 46 degrees Fahrenheit) and rainy with a stiff breeze. We call this hypothermia weather. I’m already on my second cup of tea for the day. The only request we have for the remaining time during this “active” weekend is that the sun comes out, at least for an hour.

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Racer Results

2016 Wapack and Back 50 Mile Trail Race

Yesterday, we returned to the Wapack and Back Trail Races, and for the first time, as a family. Debbie and I ran the 50 miler in 2014 and she did it the prior year in 2013 with me as her crew. This year, she ran it solo again, and the kids and I were her crew. We drove up on Friday night after work/school, which made for a long Saturday for all of us. It is tough to go from a busy week straight to an ultra. We camped at the Ashburnham, Massachusetts trailhead in our Volkswagen Eurovan, which was fun, but it’s not like sleeping in your own bed. Debbie seemed to have more energy than the kids and me because she steamrolled her way through 50 miles.

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It was quite a contrast from last month’s Zion 100 when she ran out of gas early in the race and pushed through 100 kilometers with dead legs, no strength, and no joy. Yesterday, she was back on her favorite kind of New England trails (rocky and rooty); and she was happy the entire time. She finished in 11:32, shaving 13 minutes off her previous best time, set in 2013, which proves that hitting 40 is just a number and doesn’t mean you have to slow down (at least right away!). When she reached the finish, she was only about 12 minutes behind Meredith Marx, the women’s winner. They were close all day, but Debbie was never able to catch her. At one point, around 26 miles, it looked like she had whittled a 20+ minute gap at the 16 mile mark down to three or four minutes in less than 10 miles. That was after the really rocky and slippery section up and over North Pack Monadnock and back. It had a lot of  climbing and descending on the worst of the rocks. Meredith eventually stretched that gap to seven minutes at mile 43 and then to 12 minutes by the finish. She was stronger than Debbie on the more when there were more “runnable” sections.

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The weather was blah. The runners seemed to do well in the mild temperature (low-50’s Fahrenheit) and the mist, fog, and drizzle. One challenge for the runners was the footing. However, for the crew and spectators, it was a lousy day with the kind of dampness that makes your bones creak. The lichen and moss-covered rocks and roots were like ice. You could take a serious fall. The kids and I did a bit of hiking on North Pack Monadnock Mountain, where the rocks are vicious. They “bit” us several times. That has to be the toughest section on the course, and one of the toughest sections of any trail race in New England. In hiking it, I reminded myself why Debbie likes that section so much. When I ran it in 2013, I hated it!

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I’m biased. I think we have the toughest trails in the country. The trail goes from Ashburnham to Greenfield, New Hampshire and is more like the rugged trails of the White Mountains in northern New Hampshire. Today’s Wapack is followed by tomorrow’s 7 Sisters Trail Race. We aren’t going to make it this year, but we have done it many times, and last in 2014. Long time ultrarunning acquaintance, Ian Torrence, drove from Arizona for some east coast racing and he completed Wapack and Back about 14 minutes quicker than Debbie, so he was close to her all day and we got to chat with him periodically. He noted that the course was very difficult, which is proof. He hails from Flagstaff, has raced some of the toughest trail races in the land, including the notoriously tough Zane Grey Highline Trail 50 Mile Endurance Run, a record 13 times. Debbie ran Zane Grey in 2012 and she would certainly rank Wapack and Back at the top of her tough 50 miler list.

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Wapack has more than 10,000 feet of climbing and 10,000 feet of descending and it all comes in sharp bursts. The race started at 5:00 A.M. The kids and I saw the start and then we made our way to the aid station at Windblown Ski Area (9 miles), then to Miller State Park (19 miles and 26.5 miles), back to Windblown (33 miles), and then to the finish (43 miles and 50 miles). The last 7 miles of the race are rough because you complete the 21.5 mile return leg and then have to turn around and run back 3.5 miles to the last aid station, and then run back to the finish. The time cut is tight and a lot of people settle for a 43 mile finish, which is nothing to sniff at. At 43 miles, the race runs longer than most 50’s and the 50 mile race runs more like many 100 kilometer races. I know that when I did the race, I had to be super-strong mentally to finish.

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Race Director, Jesse Veinotte invited me to try it again, but I told him that I’m still limping 24 months later. That is no lie. My plantar fasciitis and stress fracture problems with my left foot started right after my 2013 race. Jesse and his assistants, including Bob Crowley and the other volunteers from TARC were fantastic. The aid stations were stocked, the helpers dealt wit the same wet weather as we did, and they did it cheerfully. Other than the footing, the condition really were ideal  for running and there were some fast times. In the 21.5 mile one-way race, Ben Thompson broke the course record, laying down a 3:19:36, which is flying. Joanna Wang ran 5:00:13 for the women’s 21.5 mile win.

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The winner of the 50 miler was Loren Newman. He ran 9:10:56, which is a great time and now third on the all time list behind Josh Katzmann’s two times. Second man was Ben Eysenbach in 9:42:23. Meredith took the women’s win in 11:20:54, followed by Debbie in 11:32:38.

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Debbie looked good all day today. I enjoyed watching her and was happy that she was happy on the types of trails she loves. She would love to have 50 or 100 miles of rugged singletrack and never once have to go on a jeep road or dirt road. The tough courses play to her strengths. Last weekend, we had a tough couple of days of biking and running in the Berkshires and Green Mountains and I think it helped her. She doesn’t have another ultra on her 2016 schedule, so I’m not sure what is next. I’m sure something will pop up or she will find a race to focus on next. In the meantime, she has the 5 kilometer Mother’s Day Dash in Rockville, Connecticut, tomorrow.

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Her focus will shift to next week’s Soapstone Mountain Trail Races. She is the Race Director for the 13th year in a row. Soapstone is race number two in the 2016 Connecticut Blue-Blazed Trail Running Series and race five in the 2016 Grand Tree Trail Running Series. Wapack was three in the GT and 7 Sisters (today) will be number four. So, come out and join the Shenipsit Striders at Soapstone. It’s a great event with a 22.5 kilometer main event, a 6 kilometer Sampler, and a kids race.

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I’m certain that after crewing Debbie at her favorite 50 mile trail race, I’ve got the bases covered for Mother’s Day. She pretty much got what she wanted!

Race Results

SmugMug Photo Gallery

Glastenbury/West Ridge Loop & Berkshire Hills Cycling

Last July, when Debbie and I took our kids on a backpacking trip around the Glastenbury/West Ridge Loop, we remarked that this would be a great loop to run and that the two of us should return. The 22 mile loop is made of about 10 miles of the Appalachian Trail/Long Trail, 10 miles of the West Ridge Trail, a mile of dirt road, and a mile of paved Rt. 9 back to the trailhead. We returned to Vermont this weekend to tackle the challenge.

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So, with our kids safely at their grandparents house, we got out for a date/mini training camp that started yesterday afternoon and continued today. It’s truly amazing how much physical activity you can fit in when your kids aren’t around. Saturday, I rode to work on my bike early in the morning, drove home after lunch, packed, and then drove two hours with Debbie to Monroe, Massachusetts in the Berkshires. We parked at the picnic area on Rt. 2 where the Deerfield River crosses under the road.

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We did a 22 mile loop up Zoar Road to River Road past Dunbar Brook until we reached Monroe Bridge. We crossed the Deerfield and then rode the incredibly steep Monroe Hill Road climb until we reached Tunnel Road. We took the unpaved road to Steele Brook Road and then back on to pavement on Rowe Road, and then back to Zoar Road. It was a fantastic loop. The dirt sections were even steeper than the paved sections and we had a hairy descent on Steele Brook Road, where things were made even more interesting by the presence of a porcupine in the road.

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Monroe Hill Road is reportedly the 2nd steepest paved climb in New England. I would imagine that the first is the Mt. Washington Auto Road. I waited for Debbie on the climb, so I’m anxious to return with the optimal bicycle and fresh legs. I want to hit it hard the next time I ride in Monroe. It was a blast. The only drawback was waiting for Debbie at the crest of the hill with flies swirling around my head. I love riding with her. After the loop, we backtracked to Shelburne Falls for dinner at Healthy Eats, one of our favorite restaurants. After dinner, we made the hour-long drive to Woodford, Vermont. We parked at the trailhead on Rt. 9 and spent the night in our Volkswagen Eurovan, which was very convenient. The sound of City Stream was lovely. It was a mere 50 meters from the van. Nothing beats the sound of running water when you sleep and then wake.

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We got on the trail shortly after 7:00 A.M. The AT/LT climbs steadily to Goddard Shelter, just below the crest of Glastenbury Mountain, so we did a lot of hiking in the first few hours. We ran when we could, but it was mostly uphill. It started raining as soon as we got on the trail and drizzled all day. We had to wear jackets, hats, and gloves. The higher elevation temperature near the summit of Glastenbury at 3,748 feet was chilly. We stopped briefly at the shelter after 2 hours and 48 minutes before taking the fork on to the West Ridge Trail. We knew that the last 12 miles would be much quicker, and they were. We covered the remaining distance in 2 hours and 40 minutes, running the last few miles on the dirt road/road in under 20 minutes. The West Ridge Trail doesn’t see much traffic at all and it was amazing to see how the arrival of spring was already over growing the trail.

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Despite being up and down with a few decent climbs, including the one up 2,857 foot Bald Mountain, we were able to run a lot of the West Ridge. We had so much fun. Both of us used our UltrAspire packs. I used the Alpha and Debbie used the Titan. We both used our lightweight hiking poles, and they came in handy on the uphill’s. It’s amazing that we covered this distance in 5 hours and 28 minutes. Last year, with the kids, it took us about 17 hours of hiking including all of the breaks. That was spread out over an evening and two full days. We had just as much fun that weekend. For this time around the loop, we pushed it, but not too hard. Debbie has a big race next Saturday at the Wapack and Back on the Massachusetts/New Hampshire border in the Monadnock region. We were last on the Wapack Trail in 2014, so more fun to come as May progresses!

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When we got back to the trailhead on Rt. 9, we were surprised to see our friends, Ernie, Nancy, Kerri, and Ben. They had just finished driving back with their second vehicle after hiking the AT/LT north. They have been section hiking the AT throughout New England. It was great to see them and a total coincidence. If we hadn’t run the last two dirt/paved road miles in less than 20 minutes, we wouldn’t have seen them at all. It was a fun reunion.

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This weekend ended with another trip to Healthy Eats, as we worked our way back to Connecticut with another stop in Shelburne Falls. We figured, what the heck. When you find a place you like that makes great food, it doesn’t matter how often you dine there.

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2016 Fat Tire Classic

It was a family affair at today’s Fat Tire Classic at Winding Trails in Farmington, Connecticut. FTC was race #2 of the 2016 Root 66 Northeast XC Mountain Bike Series. We missed race #1 at Hop Brook Dam when we were in Utah for the Zion 100.

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This was my 9th Fat Tire Classic. I raced the singlespeed for the third year in a row. My race was four laps of the five-mile course. Debbie’s race was two laps. Our son’s race was one lap. Our daughter did the kids race.

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We had lots of fun, though the weather was cooler than we would have liked. We had brilliant sunshine, but the air was cool and there was a constant breeze. The course was drier than I’ve ever seen it. There wasn’t a drop of moisture to be found and it was dusty.

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I’ve got a serious case of “lung burn” as it was full gas the entire time. There is nowhere to hide on this course. It is constant pedaling with no respite. I was absolutely smashed at the finish. This is a building block race as I work towards fitness, so I pushed hard.

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Debbie had a good time and is getting ready to tackle the Winding Trails Summer Tri Series. We heard that there will be modifications to the five-mile MTB course for the weekly off-road triathlon series. That course is different and less technical compared to today’s route.

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Our son got his first USA Cycling racing license this week and completed his first ever junior race. He is excited to do more mountain biking and then cyclocross this fall. I didn’t get my first racing license until I was 19, so he is already got a leg up on me.

It was great to see so many Team Horst Sports mates out there on the course. We were joined by Arthur Roti, Paul Nyberg, Anthony Eisley, Mark Hixson, and Mike Wonderly. Zane Wenzel and Erik Emanuele stopped by during their Sunday road ride. In addition to our teammates, we saw a lot of friends for the first time since cross season ended back in December.

Race Results (will be posted when online)

Zion National Park, Day 2

Day 2 in Zion National Park was last Tuesday, and it was way better than Day 1, and Day 1 was pretty spectacular. We drove Kolob Terrace Road to the Wildcat Canyon Trailhead and then did the Northgate Peaks hike.

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The day after our canyoneering adventure, we wanted to stay away from crowds and see a more wild section of the park. We chose a great spot. There were hikers on the trail, but like us, they were experienced and seeking more solitude. The kids loved the hike. The out and back trail was soft and fun to walk. It wound through a lovely pine forest before reaching the viewpoint, which was awesome. We sat down had snacks, and mingled with some of the other hikers enjoying the spot.

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We topped that view by scrambling up the northern Northgate Peak, where there isn’t a marked trail. That was a blast. The kids loved it, and we lingered on the summit for a while, snapping photos and soaking in the sights. From there, we had incredible views of North Guardian Angel, the Great West Canyon, and clear to Zion Valley. We had fine weather with blue skies and big white puffy clouds. Afternoon showers were forecast, but we were done before the skies darkened and we didn’t see any rain. Our son wanted to run back to the trailhead, so I joined him and we were back at the car in 25 minutes.

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Even the drive up and down Kolob was fantastic. Outside of the park, there were several small ranches and the cows were hanging out right at the edge of the road. My only regret is that I didn’t have a road bicycle. I would love to ride the road from the valley all the way to the reservoir and back. There are also many more trailheads to explore. We have to return!

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Zion National Park, Day 1

Our “front country” day at Zion National Park was last Sunday…with the crowds. The views were spectacular, but the congestion was not. After a morning “hike” with Debbie and the kids, I was happy to break away for a three-hour run away from the crowds. As a family, we checked out the Emerald Pools.  Debbie also took the kids to the Grotto, to the Human History Museum, and several other spots accessible by the park shuttle. That shuttle is doing a good job at keeping cars out of Zion. It’s hard to believe that it’s a relatively new approach to cutting traffic in the park.

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In the valley and on the popular trails, it was very crowded, but above the East Rim headed towards Cable Mountain, I had the trail to myself. Seeing the remnants of the cable system that brought timber and building materials from the East Rim to the valley was cool. The trip down took less than 2.5 minutes, which I find fascinating.

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Hands down, this is the best of all national parks that we have been to with only one exception: Acadia. It’s not just that Acadia starts with an A, and has to come first; as a native New Englander, we just love that park. So we like both parks that start with A and Z. Utah was spectacular.

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#atlanta I'm always on the lookout for an interesting image, even in the mundane moments of life. #bdl #MD-88 #JT8D Kudos to the adult leaders who built the #obstaclecourse for the @thecubscouts Pack 157 "cross-over picnic." It was a real hit! #cubscouts #boyscouts Fun mountain bike ride to Gay City State Park via the @eastcoastgreenway #hopriverstateparktrail When we finished, he said, "My legs are wobbly." #mountainbike #cycling #teamhorstsports #snake @trailrunningmom demonstrates the use of our new @brabantia clothes dryer. #greenliving Mail commission checks to... Last step before wash and assemble. @jingalls13 getting his hands dirty @horsteng Productive Saturday shift building the #aerospace quality transition area bike racks for the #LakeTerramuggus & #CedarLake #Triathlon Series that kick off next week. #justintime #horstengineering #probono #precisionmachining #instamachinist #teamhorst #teamhorstsports #machining #cycling #sevencycles #manufacturing #madeinconnecticut #madeinusa #madeinusa🇺🇸 @jingalls13 getting his hands dirty @horsteng Productive Saturday shift building the #aerospace quality transition area bike racks for the #LakeTerramuggus & #CedarLake #Triathlon Series that kick off next week. #justintime #horstengineering #probono #precisionmachining #instamachinist #teamhorst #teamhorstsports #machining #cycling #sevencycles #manufacturing #madeinconnecticut #madeinusa #madeinusa🇺🇸 @jingalls13 getting his hands dirty @horsteng Productive Saturday shift building the #aerospace quality transition area bike racks for the #LakeTerramuggus & #CedarLake #Triathlon Series that kick off next week. #justintime #horstengineering #probono #precisionmachining #instamachinist #teamhorst #teamhorstsports #machining #cycling #sevencycles #manufacturing #madeinconnecticut #madeinusa #madeinusa🇺🇸 Productive Saturday shift @horsteng building (crafting) the #aerospace quality transition area bike racks for Race Director @jingalls13 in advance of the #LakeTerramuggus & #CedarLake #Triathlon Series that kick off next week. Special thanks to Steven, our Master Machinist/Tool & Die Maker/Manufacturing Engineer, for donating his time & developing the process. #justintime #horstengineering #probono #precisionmachining #instamachinist #teamhorst #teamhorstsports #machining #cycling #sevencycles #manufacturing #madeinconnecticut #madeinusa #madeinusa🇺🇸

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