Archive for the 'Sport' Category

#outdoorcitizen & Appalachian Mountain Club Summit

This past Saturday, the Appalachian Mountain Club Summit was held in Norwood, Massachusetts. The event coincided with the 141st annual meeting. At the end of 2016, AMC had 91,404 members across our 12 chapters.

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I’m a member of the AMC Board of Directors, and both Debbie and I are longtime members of the Board of Advisors.  AMC had a fabulous 2016. Highlights included the opening of the Harriman Outdoor Center in New York, great progress with the club’s Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion (DEI) program, the sale of our longtime Boston headquarters, and the purchase of a new headquarters building in Charlestown. An additional 4,358 acres were conserved in Maine as part of the Silver Lake project. This increases AMC’s land in Maine to more than 70,000 acres.

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The list of achievements is amazing. Those were just some of the highlights. 2017 promises to be even more momentous. The move from Boston to the expanded and modernized space in Charlestown will take place in the second half of the year. The new Medawisla Lodge will open in June. This is the third Maine lodge to be renovated/built.

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Debbie, my brother-in-law Tom, and our kids attended the Summit with me. We participated in some really cool workshop, including:

  • Primitive Navigation: The Lost Art of Finding Our Way
  • Secrets to Successful Kid-Friendly Adventures
  • Griphoist and Highline: Rocks, Ropes, Pulleys and More
  • All About Axes
  • Show & Tell: What’s in a Leader’s Pack?

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During the Summit, AMC launched #outdoorcitizen

I won’t explain it in any more detail than I have. Click through to learn more or search the hashtag on Instagram and Twitter.

2017 will be a big year for AMC. If you aren’t one of our 91,404 members, and you enjoy recreation, education, and conservation; then join! You won’t be disappointed.

Vail, Colorado

It’s no secret that I love mountains. The Appalachians are my favorite mountain range. Within the Appalachians, I love the White Mountains and the Berkshires. When it comes to mountains, especially those in the eastern United States, I don’t discriminate.

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Out west, I’ve spent time in various mountain ranges, including the Sierra’s, Santa Monica’s, Cascades, Wasatch, and Santa Rita’s, but until last week, I had never been to the Rockies. I had seen the Rocky Mountains on flights across the country, and I even viewed them from a hotel room in Denver, on my one and only trip to Colorado in 2011, but, I had never explored them.

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Given their scale, five days of skiing at Vail could barely be described as “exploring the Rockies,” but at least I can now say I’ve been there. There is so much more to see in Colorado, and then of course, there are other states like Wyoming and Montana that I’ve never seen. This trip wet my appetite for more.

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I always thought I would take a few of my bicycles to Colorado and explore the mountain roads and trails that make it a Mecca for cyclists. I never thought that the first significant time spent outdoors would be on a ski slope. I don’t come from a skiing family. My parents don’t ski or snowboard, so I didn’t get exposed to the sport at a young age. I dabbled a bit with both when I was in high school. I skied a bit in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont, but never pursued it. In college, I skied one day in Park City, Utah on a dare, and then didn’t pick it up again for 10 years until I returned to Park City with a group of friends.

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I had consciously avoided skiing out of fear of injury. My summer sports are so important to me that I didn’t want to do anything to jeopardize them through the risk of injury. When I met Debbie in 1999, she was a snowboarding instructor at Killington, but she too had been away from Alpine sports for some time.

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I have some strong skier friends, and since that trip to Utah, we have been on subsequent trips to Stowe and Jay Peak in Vermont. Despite skiing in terrible conditions, I learned to love the sport. I realized that despite the expense, it can be a fantastic family pastime. Debbie and I talked about doing more of it by introducing our kids to snowboarding. I decided to stick with skiing, and two years ago, I even bought my own downhill gear.

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As a family, we have been to Stowe, Jiminy Peak, and Mt. Southington (in Connecticut). Debbie is proficient and the goal was for the kids and I to become good enough to justify a family trip out west in the coming years. So, when this group of guys decided on a ski trip to Vail for our 2017 retreat, I was pumped.

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I knew I needed an intense and focused trip a real mountain if I was ever going to make a leap forward with my skills. The unforgiving snow conditions and short trails on New England mountains helped were limiting me.So, the trip to Vail exceeded my expectations in every way possible. I’m 10 times better after three days. We skied for 16 hours (counting our ascent and descent) and covered 58 miles with more than 70,000 feet of descent. It was a crash course in Alpine skiing. I followed my buddies all over Vail. We explored the Front Side, the Back Bowls, and Blue Sky Basin.

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We had spectacular conditions. One of my buddies, who has been skiing for 48 years, and just returned from a heli-skiing trip in British Columbia, said that they were three of the best days of skiing he has ever had. We arrived on Saturday. It snowed overnight, and on Sunday, high on the mountain, we had up to 18 inches of fresh powder. Sunday’s weather was great. It was partly sunny with occasional snow shower at the higher elevations. The visibility was fantastic and the snow was light and fluffy. We skied from 8:30 A.M. when the lifts opened, until the last lift at 3:30 P.M. We explored the Back Bowls and laid fresh tracks all over the mountain. People were letting out whoops from all directions. Even the locals reveled in the conditions.

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I had one scary moment. I was following our group through a wide-open snow field when I hit something under the snow. The collision was abrupt and I ejected from both skis. I tucked and rolled, slamming the back of my head on the ground. The depth of the snow was a blessing and a disguise. It had completely covered a felled tree. The only evidence of the tree was a small dead branch protruding from the snow, but it was more than 15 feet to the left of the section I hit, and I never saw it.

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My left ski was wedged under the log, and out of view. My right ski bounced off the log and was buried in the snow. Thankfully I hit the log straight on with my boots, and I released from the bindings. My neck and back were sore, but I was thrilled to be alive. No one saw the incident, but one of my buddies hiked back up to help me out. I had no idea what I hit until we dug out my skis and uncovered the log so that others would see it. I was shaken, and learned a vital lesson. Skiing can be very dangerous. I shook it off and continued on, though even more aware of my surroundings.

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By evening, it had started to snow again, and pretty much never stopped. The valley saw on and off snow, and from Sunday night through this morning, it snowed steadily higher up on the mountain, and at times, it came down heavy. The snow just kept coming. Monday’s conditions were just as good as Sunday’s, and there were far fewer people on the mountain. The snow wasn’t as light, so pushing through the powder presented a new challenge, but by the end of the day, I had progressed even more.

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Tuesday was our final day, so we stayed on the front side and explored more new trails. Vail is huge. You pay  a premium to ski there, but the level of service was very high. The lifts and other facilities were top-notch. The customer service was fantastic.

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I’m interested in an Alpine touring set-up so I can combine hiking with skiing. That would suit my style. I’m also looking forward to a Vail return trip and the idea of exploring other western resorts is appealing too.

Recap: 2017 USA Cyclo-Cross National Championships

It’s been more than two weeks, but I finally had the time to write a recap about the 2017 USA Cyclo-Cross National Championships in Hartford. After the incredible first day of racing (Tuesday), I wrote about the Masters 40-49 Non-Championship race, but that was just the beginning of an amazing week.

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Photo Credit: Alan Grant

In addition to all of the racing that the Masters on Team Horst Sports did, we had Junior riders compete in their own races. It was so inspiring to see the kids out there in the same tough conditions. My son’s race was on Saturday. It was so cold, but he toughed it out and will look back and smile.

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Photo Credit: Alan Grant

I raced two more times in the Masters 45-49 Championship (Friday) and Singlespeed Championship (Saturday). These were my first ever cyclocross races in January. Since I started racing cross in 1995, and after more than 150 races, I had never gone past Christmas. This season, with “Nats” in Hartford, it was a special year. I raced Nats six times before: Leicester in 1995, Ft. Devens in 1998, Baltimore in 2001, Providence in 2005, and Providence in 2006.

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2006 was the last time the championships were in New England, and since then, the annual event was moved from mid-December to early January to coincide with the national championship race calendar in Europe.

Photo Credit: Alan Grant

Photo Credit: Alan Grant

This made for a long cyclocross season. I did 21 races starting back in late-August. During the season, programmed in a couple of two-week periods without racing, which allowed me to keep my fitness through year-end. Another key with staying fit at this time of year, is to stay healthy and illness free. With young children in the household, this isn’t an easy task. Throughout December, we had small bouts of sickness in our house, but I focused on hydrating, eating well, and getting good quality sleep. Things worked out, I stayed healthy, and this was my best season yet. The capstone for the season was an amazing Nats race week.

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As far as results goes, the non-championship race on Tuesday was my highlight, finishing 19th in a competitive field. It was a crazy race, made famous by all of the photos and videos, including Ron Manizza’s viral sensation of the infamous “Slip-n-Slide Hill” at Riverside Park. The heavy rain and muddy conditions were epic.

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There is no other word to describe conditions in Hartford. They were Epic pretty much every day, but Tuesday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday had the fiercest weather and course conditions. I use the word sparingly and it only describes a handful of runs/rides/races a year, but Nats was packed with epic moments.

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So, after all the hype and getting the first race out of the way, I think my form had peaked. I also had some business travel on Wednesday of race week, and a lot going on with Horst Spikes, including our Open House and Plant Tour on Thursday night. It was a busy week for us. We welcomed more than customers from all over the country and gained many new customers as the week went on. The exposure for our Cross Spikes™ product line was even greater than we anticipated and could hope for. The super-challenging Nats course (which kept changing like a chameleon) was the ultimate proving ground for spikes, with slippery run-ups, steep descents (some unrideable), and numerous off-camber sections.

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With everything going on, my legs were tired by the time my championship race at 2:50 P.M. on Friday afternoon. We awoke on Friday to several inches of snow. The muddy course from earlier in the week had hardened as the temperature dropped, creating frozen ruts. The fresh layer of slow covered the ruts and ice. It was very cold (and breezy) by afternoon, but bright sun warmed sections of the course, which turned it into a frozen mud/ice mixture. These were some of the most challenging conditions of the week. Whereas Tuesday was pure (and deep) mud, Friday was a slick mix.

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I’m still happy with my result. I had a really good start from the fifth row and was in the high 20’s after the first lap, but the technical conditions muted my fitness/power and I faded throughout the race. Ultimately, I finished 42nd (out of a 100 riders or so), after yielding a few more spots on the final lap. I had one hard fall, and sadly, on a paved path, and it cost me some time. I wasn’t happy about getting passed by so many guys after my good start, but I had taken enough chances and was tentative on some parts of the course. I can’t say enough good things about my gear.

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All season, I’ve been racing my five-year old SevenMudhoney Pro. The bike is going to need some post-season work, but the machine has done great. My Campagnolo drivetrain and Zipp 303 wheels held up great. I could have used fresh tires, but with everything going on, didn’t have time to glue them, so I rode the Tufo pair that I had used for most of the season. My gear didn’t hold me back. Ultimately, I didn’t have the legs to repeat the strong ride that I had on Tuesday. Still, at the finish, I was all smiles.

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Saturday was the coldest day of the week. Overnight on Friday, the temperature plummeted again, making the course hard, icy, and fast. Many of the Junior races, including the 11-12 year old race that our son competed in, were held in the morning. They enjoyed a precipitation free race, but by noon, the snow was flying again. Debbie and our daughter came to watch, but everyone was cold, so they returned home after the boys raced.

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I was registered for the Singlespeed Championship at 2:50 P.M., and the snow was coming down heavy. Since my race on Friday afternoon, I had been hemming and hawing about doing one more race. It would have been easy to bag it. With a banged up knee, sore legs, and cold hands/feet; I decided to skip it. Then, the snow got heavier. I looked around and realized that I would regret not racing. The singlespeed race would likely go down as one of the most epic ever.

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I thought about driving to Horst Engineering in East Hartford, only five minutes from the park, but instead decided to drive the 20 minutes home. It took 30 minutes because of terrible road conditions, but I was able to get there with enough time to warm up, change my clothes, and get ready for my last race of the season. I decided to drive in my kit so that I could go from the parking lot to the Team Horst Sports tent and not have to change at all.

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When I got back to the park, there were more than four inches of snow on the ground and it was still falling steadily. This was my first ever singlespeed cross race. I converted my 20-year-old Richard Sachs. It’s a great bike, but I haven’t raced it in years and I’m not nearly as comfortable on it as I am on my Seven. I’m not a very good snow rider and it showed. This was the largest race of the week with more than 120 strong riders in the field. I was 74th, but that doesn’t matter at all. I had a blast. Crowds had formed on the dike, and the atmosphere was electric. Just like the mud race on Tuesday, riders were falling all over the place. The big difference was that everything was white and there wasn’t a drop of mud to be found.

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I slid my way around the course and amazingly stayed pretty warm. I had dressed right for the occasion. I didn’t linger long after the finish. With more than five inches on the ground, I made my way back home to clean up my gear and store it for winter. I did drive back to Hartford late in the evening to watch the Mechanics Championship at the Black Bear Saloon. The crowd was festive and I saw many friends.

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The members of Team Horst Sports also had a great week. Arthur Roti, Wade Summers, Matt Domnarski, Dave Geissert, Paul Nyberg, and Tom Ricardi all raced multiple times. In addition to those guys, it was fun to see so m any friends from the New England cycling community. It was great to battle with so many of my “rivals” and I’m already looking forward to the beginning of the 2017-2018 season in August.

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Sunday’s Elite races were the culmination of a fantastic National Championships. My son and I returned to Riverside Park to watch. This was one of the best days the New England cycling community had ever seen. The snow had changed the complexion of the course yet again. The clouds cleared and bright sun shone. This caused quite a bit of melting, so once again, mud returned. This made for both visually appealing, and very challenging racing. Victories by Katie Compton and Stephen Hyde, who were both using their Horst Spikes™, topped off the festivities. Even in the cold, snow, and mud, the fans came out in force. The atmosphere was electric and many of us can’t wait until Nats return to New England. Hopefully, it isn’t another 12 year wait. Next year, the event is in Reno, Nevada.

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Race hosts, the Connecticut Cycling Advancement Program, and their cadre of volunteers (many from our team) put on a good show. Come spring, Riverside Park will require some repairs, but that’s OK. This was a great event for Riverfront Recapture. They want to see people using and enjoying the parks that they manage. The Internet is full of great images and stories from this amazing week of racing. Hartford has always been on the map, but many people were skeptical about the idea of Nats at Riverside Park.

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When Team Horst Sports put on the first cyclocross race there in 2003, we knew that the venue had the right characteristics and was a championship course candidate. We organized the first ever Connecticut Riverfront Cyclocross at Riverside Park. We weren’t directly involved with bringing Nats to Hartford in 2017, but I have no doubt that we sowed the seeds for what was an awesome event.

I’m so proud that the race was in Hartford.

Race Results

2017 USA Cyclo-Cross Nationals 40-49 Non-Championship

Wow. Wow. Wow. What a race. I left my iPhone back at Horst Engineering by mistake, so I don’t have any of my own photos from the race. I capture a few images of the “aftermath.”

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That’s OK, I needed both hands to hold on to the handlebars! The 2017 USA Cyclo-Cross National Championships kicked off in a big way today. I’m feeling a bit sad for the Riverside Park course. It’s already taken a beating and there are five days of racing to go.

I love cyclocross and the environment, so I’ll be there (with the crews) in the spring to fix the course up. Cross does do damage when conditions are as wet as they were today. Riverside Park isn’t pristine anyway. It is in the Connecticut River flood plain, which made the mud so, well…muddy.

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The rain came down heavily and turned the course into a quagmire. I pre-rode yesterday when it was 34 degrees Fahrenheit, firm, and a bit icy. Today, it was 40 degrees and pouring. Many of the rideable sections became unrideable as the race went on.

The downhill off the dike was treacherous. I opted for caution, which may have cost me some time, but saved me in the long run. I’ll be able to go to work tomorrow! I had a really good start, lost some ground, made up a little ground, made a few mistakes, and then pretty much survived until the finish.

I was able to get three laps done, but only cover 5.8 miles in 44:36. That was good for 19th out of about a 100 riders. I would love to break the top-15 in the 45-49 Championship Race on Friday. There will be a little more top competition, but filter out the “younger” guys, and it’s possible.

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Adam Myerson, who is one of our sponsored Horst Spikes athletes, rode marvelously for the win. I’m pretty sure he was using Ice & Snow Cross Spikes, just like me. Horst Spikes have been popular this week. We are letting athletes pick-up at our 36 Cedar St. plant, which is only five minutes from the park. Toe spikes were critical for maintaining any grip on the uphill sections.

The entire Team Horst Sports 40-49 year-old squad did well. I was followed by Wade Summers, Art Roti, Andris Skulte, and Randall Dutton. Our 50-59 riders were on the course when I packed up and headed for a warmer environment. I shouted loudly for Matt Domnarski, Tom Ricardi, and Dave Geissert. I had a lot of friends in the race too, and they weren’t all local. Aaron Ofsiany was in town from San Francisco. I’ll see him again later in the week.

I started on Row 2, along with my long time friend, Jon Gallagher. Jon and I spent the summer of 1994 together and we have had some great adventures over the years. This was another one to add to the list. I chased him for the first part of the race before he pulled away to finish 13th. His timing services business is handling all of the official results for the race this week.

Judging by some of the Facebook and Instagram footage, anyone who raced today deserves monster kudos.

Race Results

Preview: 2017 USA Cyclo-Cross Nationals

I helped with the Horst Spikes marketing related to next week’s USA Cyclo-Cross National Championships. Here is the basic info. Be sure to check out the Horst Spikes News, in case you haven’t seen it already!

Next week, Hartford, Connecticut is welcoming the 2017 USA Cyclo-Cross National Championships.

 

Today, we launched a special edition of Horst Spikes News that is chock full of resources for athletes, volunteers, and spectators. It’s a comprehensive guide to everything happening next week. Check it out.

The cyclocross season is winding down, but it will go out with a bang! The 2017 USA National Cyclocross Championships are a week away. This will be the biggest cross race that Connecticut has ever seen. The KMC Cross-Fest in October was a fantastic success and we look forward to 2017, New England has hosted the national championships on several occasions, but this is the first time the event has come to our home state.

Horst Engineering is heavily invested in the success of this event. We were founded in Hartford and our headquarters is on the Connecticut River in East Hartford, a stone’s throw from the Riverside Park venue. We are longtime supporters of hosts: The Connecticut Cycling Advancement Program (CCAP) and Riverfront Recapture.

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Team Horst Sports members will be competing in several races, including the Masters Championship and Juniors Championship events. Many team members, including those who don’t race cyclocross, will be volunteering to help.

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We organized the first ever Connecticut Riverfront Cyclocross at Riverside Park in 2003. Our lineup of Horst Spikes™ cyclocross toe spikes were tested and developed on our hometown course. Cross Spikes™ have brought us back into the bicycling industry in a big way. Our roots are in bikes and we couldn’t be more proud of Hartford to host such a cool event.

2016 Scrooge Scramble

Today, we did the 26th Scrooge Scramble 5K in Rockville, Connecticut. The annual Christmas Day race benefits the Cornerstone Foundation

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It was great to see so many friends. Both the Shenipsit Striders and Silk City Striders were well represented.

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The course was slightly different from past years. We took a left into the driveway for Cabin Hill Greenhouses. We did a loop in front of their building, and then returned to the regular course.

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Debbie ran with our daughter. My son and I ran hard and we both pushed it a bit, but our main event is in 10 days when we race the 2017 USA National Cyclocross Championships at Riverside Park in Hartford. We had great weather with bright sunshine, a mild temperature in the low-40’s Fahrenheit. This fun run is a nice tradition.

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Race Results

2016 Elm City Cyclocross

Wow, what a race! Today, we had true New England cyclocross conditions at the Elm City CX in New Haven’s Edgewood Park. After yesterday’s white out, we the temperature warmed overnight, and we were rewarded with an absolute mud and slushfest at today’s race.

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It was snowy. It was icy. It was wet. It was slippery. It was dirty. It was challenging. It was so much fun!

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I know I have good legs, but I wasn’t able to use them to the best of my ability because of the technical nature of the course. The snow turned to mush and it went from white to brown after the first few races of the day.

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The Team Horst Sports Cub Juniors were out in force today. Cole, Shepard and Sean, who both raced yesterday at March Farms, were joined by Lars and Nate. They started a bit late, around 10:00 A.M. By then, the Category 4/5 Men had turned the course to mush. As the temperature continued to climb, peaking around 53 degrees Fahrenheit, the course got softer and muddier as deep ruts were worn into the ground.

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Several parts of the course had hot pockets of air. Other sections, there were cold pockets. It was weird. You would ride into the woods and hit a wall of warmth, which would instantly fog your glasses. Speaking of fog, it was hanging low over all of New Haven as the moisture from the cold ground evaporated.

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After the deep freeze two days ago, then the snow, and now the unseasonably warmth today, we are headed for more arctic cold tonight. By the early afternoon, the weather was changing again. The wind started to blow and the temperature, which had risen so rapidly, was already starting to drop.

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This sort of changeable weather is sort of normal for Connecticut, and it made for awesome cyclocross conditions. So, the Cub Juniors did really well. Sean scored 4th place again, securing a high-ranking in the CT Series of CX, since this was the final race.

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We have a three-week break from cross. This was the last regular season race, and in any other year, it would be the last race of the season, at least in our region. Technically, it is the last race of the year, but not the last race of the season. In three weeks, we will welcome nearly 2,000 racers to compete in the USA Cycling Cyclocross National Championships at Riverside Park in Hartford.

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There was a lot more riding today. Yesterday, the snow was dry and deep. Running in it was like running in sand. Today, the snow was like mashed potatoes. It stuck to your pedals, your wheels, and especially to your shoes.

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I had a solid race, but couldn’t open it up as much as I would have liked. I’ve gotten better at these technical races, but I’m still not the best when the traction is as poor as it was today. I feel like I had something left when I finished, but I couldn’t go any faster.

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For the first few laps, I was alone chasing the three leaders (Garth Schwellenbach, Brian Girard, and Joe Kubisek), but then I was joined by several other riders. Stan Lezon, who is one of my Bolton neighbors, has quickly become my new “nemesis.” We have been battling all season long. He has gotten stronger and we have had some good tactical races, trading positions on several occasions. Yesterday, he finished second, and I was third.

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He was in the group that bridged up to me. My teammates, Wade Summers and Art Roti, were also at the tail end of the group. Karel Citroen and John Meyerle were also in the mix. I kept the pressure on and eventually the group blew apart. I know that several of those guys went down, a few of them multiple times. I was able to stay upright. Maybe I wasn’t pushing hard enough? Either way, I had my share of close calls. I slammed my right shoulder on a tree when I slid out in a corner, but I didn’t crash.

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As the race went on, the course got even more slippery. Some sections, including the tricky descent were pretty dangerous. It was the kind of exciting riding that we love. The only drawback to a race like this is the damage it does to your gear. It takes time to clean all of your stuff, including your bikes, shoes, and clothing.

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Stan and I changed places a few times with two to go. Then, we came into some lapped traffic. The 50+ riders had started a minute or two behind us. Stan got held up around a hairpin turn, so I dismounted, cut it hard on the inside, and ran past, taking the position. I didn’t hold it for long. He caught me and dropped the hammer. I closed the gap one more time, but then he was gone. He might have taken a few more risks and the gap grew.

The last time up the hill, Karel surged past me and we rubbed shoulders a bit, but I couldn’t hold his wheel and he got away. I was able to hold my spot and ended up 6th. Team Horst was also represented in the 50+ field with Matt Domnarski, Dave Geissert, Tom Ricardi, and Paul Nyberg all finishing in the top 15. It’s been a great season racing with all of these guys.

It’s sad for the Connecticut series to end, but we have Nats to look forward to. After that, there will be a long break from cross. Over the next few months, we will turn our attention to watching the big European elite races. There were two this weekend in Belgium. Yesterday, the top riders were at the Scheldecross, and today, at the UCI World Cup in Namur. It would be fun to see those top racers ride a course like Elm City. It would be fun to see how fast they really go. The crew from Amity Bike and the Laurel Bike Club did a great job with the race and deserve extra credit for putting on an event in such foul weather. Last year, the weather was spectacular. Today, it was spectacular in its own way. I heard several other riders proclaim that they are sad to see the season come to an end.

Race Results (will be posted when online)


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On the road again. @seven_cycles #sevencycles #teamhorstsports #atl Starting the 2017 #trailrunning season in style...and on a Monday morning in the #caribbean to add to the fun! @trailrunningmom won the 13.8 mile #stjohntrailrace in 2:37. She wasn't far behind me. The @virginislandsnps trails were gnarly and it was hot. #teamhorstsports #shenipsitstriders @altrarunning #altrarunning @ultraspire #ultraspire @julbousa #julbousa #family #hiking #stjohnusvi @virginislandsnps #virginislandsnps Nice colors on our early A.M. flight. #md88 #JT8D #aerospace #sunrise ☀️ I'm pumped! I scored 47 vintage @appalachianmountainclub #Appalachia Journals (various issues between 1916-1979) with a #craigslist purchase. The process started with a #google Alert, and then after an email inquiry, followed by a text, and then a call; the terms were set. Hours later I pulled off the Mass Pike on my commute home from #sterlingmachine and did the deal in a commuter lot. I was fascinated by the seller's full time career in dealing ephemera and other collectibles. I'll add these to the stack of unread magazines, including the 10 boxes of vintage @natgeo magazines I scored years ago that @trailrunningmom keeps asking me where I plan to store them. We need more bookshelves. I've been getting Appalachia via mail twice/Year for 20 years and it has been published continuously since the #appalachianmountainclub founding in 1876. We wrapped up this snowy week with an afternoon #snowshoe "commute" to Little D's @girlscouts Brownie meeting and back. We are quite fortunate to have trails right out our front and back doors. #carfreecommute #boltonheritagefarm #rosefarm

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